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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game
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Now displaying: June, 2017
Jun 27, 2017

Jay Peters is the Managing Director at Park USA, and a leading expert in the management of design and innovation. We go deep into what design management really is and how anyone can use it to bring more innovation to the table. He shares tools for leveraging design management not only to get better outcomes, but also to challenge conventional approaches to solving problems and building a brand. For brands he gives the argument for why design management is critical to their success.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:03] Jay explains the how, what, and why of design management. Orchestration of all the multiple touch points in a consumer or design experience is essential. This ensures that the end result is an enjoyable end product for the consumer.

[4:09] Jay talks about touchpoints that innovators may sometimes miss. He mentions service. Does the design have any influence on customer service? He shares with us the effectiveness of the Apple experience of the genius bar. Be on the lookout for  outpoints that may give the customer an “ouch point” experience.

[6:35] What is the actual value that design management brings? What qualifications must the design management team possess?

[9:12] Design is rapidly moving forward due to technology. The role of UX (user experience) has been adopted to the technology industry. Globalization is also playing a big role. Jay predicts that design itself is becoming consolidated and commoditized.

[13:44] Circular design shifts how you think about what you bring to market. After the initial purchase, can you shift the innovation to service of the product? How can you continue to innovate and sell the product?

[15:31] Jay shares his belief that you cannot not have an experience. You will either have a positive or negative experience that will influence the success or failure of your product. Brand experience must be orchestrated so that the outcome is positive.

[17:02] Tamara shares her “ouch point” experience with Tough Mudder. She shares that there is a big disconnect between the experience leading up to the event and the event itself. She feels customer service is not connecting for the race day experience.

[19:06] Is innovation led by design? What department is responsible for innovation?

The first step in innovation is to understand an awareness. What does design mean for you? Next, you need to create the vision and roadmap.

[22:19] What roadblocks do businesses have to overcome? Roles and responsibilities are often a roadblock. Resources also must be prioritized and allocated.

[25:43] Design drives differentiation and creates a competitive advantage. The more elements you can design, the more sustainable design you will have.

[30:31] How does design management help in creating a culture of innovation? It’s all about people, process, tools, and training.

[33:56] Jay shares a tip to help businesses get moving forward. Design management consists of a triad: design, brand, and innovation. The question must be answered to help to nail down what aspect is driving your company.

[37:06] Tamara and Jay talk about the importance of using your own product to experience empathy.

Connect with Jay at Empowering.design

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

Mentioned in This Episode:

Connect with Jay at PARK

Read Jay's Blog at Empowering Design Leaders

Jun 20, 2017

Heather Ann Havenwood, is a serial entrepreneur, and is regarded as a top authority on digital marketing, sales coaching, and online publishing business strategies. Heather Ann has been named Top 50 Must Follow Women Entrepreneurs for 2017 by Huffington Post. She is also called Chief Sexy Boss™ (from her Amazon BEST SELLER book Sexy Boss™,  How Female Entrepreneurship is Changing the Rule Book and Beating the Big Boys). We get into a rich conversation about what it means to go from losing everything to being a leading entrepreneur, how to get scrappy to get what you want, and how doing it like everyone else gets you nowhere.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:57] Heather shares her experience that led her to entrepreneurship. She believes that entrepreneurship is a journey that finds you.

[4:24] How being scrappy can help you to realize opportunity and get you in the back door. (Even if it includes you being the wife of Bob, a person you have never met before.)

[7:17] Heather explains that most often you need to be at a low point to find “it.” Your opportunity will come when you realize that you are an entrepreneur, and your charge is the game of developing commerce. This is not a destination.

[12:24] How does one approach risk? It wasn’t until Heather wrote a contract allowing her to fail that she was able to  open the door to succeed. Why are so many people afraid to fail?

[16:22] Tamara shares that failure in innovation is more about figuring out what needs to be done to adjust and tweak the product. It’s a powerful tool to ask yourself, “What did I learn?” Heather views failure as feedback. The marketplace is the source to keep your eyes on for feedback. Your friends are not the market!

[20:57] Heather believes that the most important skill a successful entrepreneur can possess is strong sales copywriting or direct response marketing. You must understand human behavior and be able to get into their minds.

[25:34] Heather specializes in helping businesses understand the ups and down of the marketplace. She also is a master at product launching, and helping to get people to show up to reality (having people complete the purchase).

[28:12] Tamara believes that the marathon really begins with the sales process. Marketing is not sales. A direct response will move the consumer through the product to purchasing.

[29:40] What unique aspect drives people to buy the Squatty Potty?

 

[31:36] Innovation is essential to consumers. Go straight to the consumer. Listen in about the innovation geniusness of Poo Pourri. There are so many paths to success. Make sure you aren’t on a one-way path.

[34:47] Innovation requires you to think differently about your product and how you will bring it to market. It’s important to always be pitching and testing the validity of your product early and often.

[40:34] Why did Heather call her book, Sexy Boss?

[43:38] Heather helps clients to earn momentum, to take them from where they are in sales, and double or triple their sales. Heather works with clients that are actually making money and yearning for more clarity and focus. Arrogance is a big killer in business and innovation.

Connect with Heather at HeatherHavenwood.com

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on Launch Street — gotolaunchstreet.com

Mentioned in This Episode:

Heather’s homepage

Buy Sexy Boss on Amazon

Jun 13, 2017

Traci Brown is the body language and persuasion expert. She’s continually asked for her expert advice, uncovering hidden secrets hiding in plain site, on NBC, CBS and Fox. Traci is a Three Time US Collegiate Cycling Champion and former member of Team USA. She is a sought-after keynote speaker and the author of four books. We chat about how to master your own body language for persuasion, and how to recognize the nonverbal cues people are giving you, regardless of what they are saying.

Key Takeaways:

[1:55] The first key in using and understanding your body language is to open your eyes and pay attention.

[2:33] Traci began winning cycling races when she figured out that by watching her competition, watch for a drop in the shoulder, hitch in the pedal, she was able to predict their next move. Mental training also was a big part to her success. This success launched her into counseling clients and finally into keynote speaking.

[5:34] In business, you should always be looking to understand how others are perceiving you. You have to pay attention. Is the big decision maker looking at you? Are they leaning forward? Are they nodding yes? Are their arms crossed in front? The mind will follow the body. Be strategic in changing their body position.

[10:28] Traci shares her personal experience at the National Speakers Association Conference pitching to the Shark Tank panel. How did watching Kevin’s body language help Traci to get him to bite at her business proposal? Find out some tips to take control of your own physiology.

[16:43] Find out what Lance Armstrong, Chris Christie, and Vladimir Putin have in common. How do you address the body language of sharks?

[18:07] Why are tiny solutions so important? The more expensive of a problem you solve, the more people will pay for the tiny solution.

[22:50] What unconscious tells do we give that we don’t even know about? The body can’t lie. While making  your sales pitch, are you shrugging your shoulders or nodding your head back and forth?

[25:49] Tamara tells her experience about a recent meeting in which body language counteracted the sales message. Traci tells why It’s important to pull more information out, so that you can gather all of the needed valuable information. We make our decisions by how the other person makes us feel.

[28:24] Is a shark the magic bullet? Who are the sharks in our lives?

[29:07] Traci and Tamara let us in on some body language tips while on stage: First, stand up straight. Second, don’t sidestep across the stage. Third, Don’t shimmy (grapevine) on the stage. Fourth, share negativity in the past and positivity in the future.

[34:00] The single most important thing to persuade is that you pay attention. We must be flexible in our communication, so that the receiver receives the intended message. Tamara shares that we need to call out the behavior that we see.

Watch Traci's 21 day language body makeover tips on you tube.

Connect with Traci on her home page.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Body Language Trainer

Jun 6, 2017

Lisa Bodell is the CEO of Futurethink and the best selling author of Kill The Company and her latest book, Why Simple Wins. She is a recognized global leader on innovation foresight and change management. We dig deep into the power of simplification in your personal and professional life, how to know the difference between mundane and mission work, and why it’s important to become your own Chief Simplicity Officer.

Key Takeaways:

[2:45] Lisa shares that her passion of simplification came from trying to solve her own problem. Ask yourself, Am I spending my time on things that are valuable? It’s not about doing more, it’s about doing better. How do you know what the ‘right things’ are?

[6:04] Lisa discusses the T-chart exercise. What you do versus what you would like to do? Honestly complete this exercise, and see what this exercise tells you about yourself.

[7:50] How can killing complexity help you to have the mindset to figure out what is the work that matters?

[8:20] Lisa explains that it’s easy to identify where corporations need help.  Find out how she identifies by using the T-chart. The left side of the chart represents the mundane, boring, and tactile. The right hand side represents visionary, emotional, and inspiring. Which side do most people identify with?

[10:06] How does complexity impact innovation? Often, there is just no time to innovate. We must simplify, so that there is space for innovation to occur.

[11:40] Tamara and Lisa discuss her recent TED Talk. Lisa believes that thinking has become a daring act. We are so addicted to doing, that we have a hard time thinking. Thinking needs to be moved to the forefront. Tamara shares her personal experience with trying to think on the job.

[15:20] What roles do technology and human nature play in simplification?  Somebody must ask the difficult questions to simplify. Courage is a requirement to operate with less.

[19:34] Tamara shares her belief that simplicity isn’t about how to become more productive. It’s about pulling away from the unnecessary complexities in our everyday lives.

[21:04] Chief Simplicity Officer requirements are: First, have courage. Second, operate like a minimalist. Third, Be results-oriented. (It’s about outcome not action). And, fourth, Stay focused.

[23:03] Lisa shares ways to shift from being action- to outcome-oriented.  She shares her experience with Sprint. You need an outrageous, audacious uncomfortable goal to work toward.

[26:45] When you simplify, the ability to innovate becomes second nature, because they have the energy and enthusiasm. The ability to get things done is the major driver of innovation.

[30:11] What is a simplification code of conduct? It’s important to take away the risk and fear, to get people to realize that some things can be eliminated.

[34:30] Lisa talks about ways she has simplified ways in her own life both at work and personally. You have to start with yourself and begin eliminating items from the left hand side of the T-chart. Pilot saying, ‘no.’

[37:25] People don’t realize the amount of complexities they are drowning in. They also don’t realize that they have the power to change these things. Begin to take control by reading Lisa’s book, Why Simplicity Wins and don’t forget to order the Toolkit.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Futurethink Homepage

Why Simple Wins: Escape the Complexity Trap and Get to Work That Matters,
by Lisa Bodell

Why Simple Wins Toolkit, by Lisa Bodell

TEDx Talk on Simplicity

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