Info

Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
RSS Feed
Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game
2019
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: September, 2018
Sep 25, 2018

Are you looking for innovation in the wrong place? Our guests on Inside LaunchStreet, Joel Clark and Cameron Smith, owners of the knocking it out of the park food brand Kodiak Cakes, think we might be. In fact, they grew Kodiak from a boutique to a $100 million business. The key? They look at categories in decline as an opportunity versus chasing high growth areas that we think we want to jump into. Definitely a mindshift and there’s proof to back it up. We talk about managing doubt from others and in yourself. We even validate some of your gut decisions when we talk about how decisions that don’t have data are often the times you see the trends and patterns before someone has the chance to turn them into data. Joel and Cameron also share how they built a culture of innovation on passion and transparency.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:23] You might be surprised that Joel has a phobia of bears. He stays awake all night while camping. Cameron also shares a fear of animals. He grew a love for Nebraska sports selling pop on Saturdays.

[5:10] Joel and Cameron talk about how Kodiak Cakes first got started. Joel started selling Kodiak cakes in brown paper bags out of his little red wagon as an eight-year-old.

[7:14] Why did Joel and Cameron go into a category that was rapidly declining? Listen in as they talk about what motivated them to continue.

[10:58] Find out what changed after Joel and Cameron appeared on Shark Tank.

[13:22] Joel and Cameron believe that the perfect opportunity to bring people back into the category is during a decline. How did they convince stores to get their product on the shelves?

[17:24] Tamara was recently in the grocery store and was overwhelmed at the choices in the breakfast aisle. She asked Joel and Cameron how do you stand out to the customers? Cameron talks about how the protein powder pancake was an unanticipated explosion. He talks about the doubters and non-believers. He advises listeners to go with your gut and believe it’s going to work.

[22:08] Joel shares an experience about when they first started out. Some people doubted buyers would pay the extra money for the product. As entrepreneurs, you have to make irrational decisions and act on those. Tamara shares that lots of times, the trends are ahead of the data.

[26:20] Kodiak Cakes has experienced rapid growth since appearing on Shark Tank. How are Joel and Cameron building their culture so that they’re innovative and continue to grow?

[28:50] Kodiak Cakes believes transparency is key so that all employees feel free to innovate and create. Tamara reiterates that if the employees feel invested, the passion to innovate is huge.

[33:42] Kodiak Cakes is super excited that they are expanding their baking products. Look for various microwave products in a cup. They are looking for categories that need innovation, and need healthier options. Tamara reminds listeners of the importance of looking for products that need innovation and finding the gap.

[37:14] What are the downsides and risk of investing in declining categories?

[38:34] How do you decrease the adoption curve? Social media can help drive awareness and trial.

[40:38] Connect with Joel and Cameron at Kodiak Cakes and on Instagram.

[41:10] Joel reminds listeners that sometimes things take time. A lot more time than you think. Success requires patience and perseverance. Cameron tells listeners that you must have confidence in yourself. His biggest ‘aha’ is that you have to believe in yourself.

[45:06] Tamara really loved the part about leading with transparency. It’s key to getting ownership within the team. She invites listeners to go to the Inside Launchshtreet Blog, watch a video and implement one thing that will help build your innovative culture.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Kodiak Cakes Homepage

Sep 18, 2018

Ever wonder how “the greats” do it? Me too. That’s why I had motivational speaker, business coach, and 11-time New York Times Best-Selling author Don Yeager on Inside LaunchStreet. He began his career as a writer for The San Antonio Light, and the Dallas Morning News until he became an Associate Editor for Sports Illustrated in 1996, where he worked for over ten years. You’ll appreciate how he defines greatness in a way that actually includes everyday people like you and me. His story about the baseball player, David Ross, isn’t actually about baseball. It’s a story of perseverance, being open to criticism, actually using criticism to move forward, and finding greatness in a totally unexpected way. The story Don shares, I think, is also one we innovators need to pay attention to. There are lessons in there for us as we fight the legacy systems, try to get buy-in, and push forward. We also talk about his book, Greatness and some of the traits of greatness, which aren’t about talent. In fact, it’s about the little things you do every day. He also shared some interesting perspective on why we shouldn’t celebrate our wins for too long; that is actually us, trapped in the past.

 

Key Takeaways:

[3:49] You might be surprised to know that Don plays the ukulele. It’s the thing that makes him cool in his kids’ eyes.

[4:49] Don believes greatness is an ideal, the pursuit of something. It’s not something that you can achieve. Tamara questions why you keep doing something if you never achieve your goal.

[6:58] James Bailey, a LaunchStreet listener, submitted the question, how do you identify your aha moments?

[9:08] Can you train yourself to celebrate your wins and wake up the next day in the pursuit of greatness?

[11:33] A great coach will see success if the team collectively improves on a daily basis. It’s not all about winning the Superbowl. It’s about creating change. It’s about doing small things to get there. It’s about a continual progression. Tamara reminds listeners that innovation happens when small changes work to create the big change.

[14:36] What’s the first step to getting past the “if only” and putting myself on the path to change? Don talks about his book, Greatness. He interviewed 2,500 of the greatest sports icons over a 25-year period. The question he asked was, what did you do that set you apart from other people? The most popular answer was that they hated to lose more than they love to win. Failure is the idea that drives most people. You stop making excuses and accept the failure for what it is. The truly great ones have long since stopped making excuses.

[17:20] Tamara talks about the sudden moments of self-sabotage. Oftentimes, not only do we make the excuses after, but even before, so that our failure is validated.

[20:50] The number two answer that came up in the interviews was that successful sports players surrounded themselves with people that were looking to achieve the same success or greater. If you’re surrounded by mediocrity, that’s what you’ll achieve.

[22:44] What does it mean to chase it with abandon? In my space, what does exceptionalism look like? Listen in as Don lays out how to engage in the chase.

[25:53] Tamara points out that you don’t have to be alone in a vacuum. Feedback is so important as you engage. Tamara shares that she is a Crossfit addict. Her goal is to stay in the top 100 in her regional age group. She realized that she doesn’t like to lose and it’s her motivation. Oftentimes, her friends aren’t helping her to achieve her goal.

[29:04] Don talks about visualizing victory. Mentally, put yourself visually in the place to feel success. He talks about Serena Williams and her routine before her tennis match. Successful people understand the value of self-talk. They use adversity as fuel.

[32:05] What things are gained in adversity? The most unappreciated muscle is resilience. You must have a short memory of failure. Human nature means that we sit and wallow in things far too long. We also celebrate success way too long. The key to all of this is to defy human nature. Step away from your past typical habit.

[36:44] Tamara believes that often we don’t deconstruct after we win. In some ways, it’s helpful to treat failure and success the same way.

[37:15] Don’s book, Teammate, is about baseball player David Ross. David was cut from the Cincinnati Reds and recruited by the Red Sox as a third-string catcher. David’s manager called him in and told him that his reputation is that he isn’t a team player and that he wouldn’t be renewed. He began a journey of making himself a great teammate. He went on to win several world series. David Ross learned to become invaluable without ever being valuable.

[43:44] Don had been doing speaking engagements about making teams better. He celebrated employees that were pointed out as being great team members. Many employees commented that they had never been celebrated before. Everything is all about out high performers. Tamara points out that you focus on the pursuit of greatness by taking the actions that you take every single day.

[46:57] How does stepping into greatness bring more innovation to the front?

[49:09] Connect with Don here.

[50:05] Don’s final piece of advice to Inside LaunchStreet listeners to pay attention to your inner circle. Seek out people that could help your mindset grow and flourish. Tamara finds that sometimes it’s the people that make you uncomfortable that can help you move forward. Don will email listeners the digital version of the 16 characteristics of greatness. Simply email Don at Don2@team180.com. Put Inside LaunchStreet in the subject line.

[53:13] Tamara is going to begin seeing greatness as a daily pursuit instead of the end goal. She challenges listeners to think about what you are in pursuit of. She invites you to share your pursuit.

 If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Dons Homepage

Greatness: The 16 Characteristics of True Champions, by Don Yaeger

Teammate: My Journey in Baseball and a World Series for the Ages, by David Ross with Don Yaeger

 

Sep 11, 2018

So, what do you do when the world moves faster than your company’s processes? Aren’t a lot of us facing that? Innovators dealing with systems that feel like they are working against us? That’s why I had Lewis Lin, CEO of People Maven, on Inside LaunchStreet. He took an outdated, legacy process, in this case, HR, found the broken parts and fixed it. And with People Maven, he found a way to leverage our hyper-connected world to your benefit. We dig into their company values which are a big part of their success — “40% innovative” and “possibility seekers.” He shares how living those values help them compete, and win, against the big dogs and drive innovation that helps you do more with less. He shared his favorite ideation exercise, the reversal method and why we should be focusing on progress, not strategy if we want to see innovation happen.

 

Key Takeaways:

[3:10] You might be surprised to know that Lewis chose his college major due to the open book test policy.

[4:48] Listen in to find out what prompted Lewis to start People Maven.

[7:33] Why does the traditional recruitment process take upwards of three months to hire? Is this advantageous to the hiring company? How does People Maven help solve the hiring problem?

[9:45] Tamara and Lewis discuss some of People Maven’s daily principles. The first principle they talk about is 40% innovators. The way that People Maven will win against the people with deep pockets is to think about the problems differently and attempt game-changing innovation. 40% is a symbolic reminder to us that we have to be swinging for the fences. We have to change the game by at least 40%.

[11:59] How do you look at problems differently? Lews is a huge fan of design and brainstorming. Get introduced to the brainstorming technique the “reversal method.” Lewis shares an example of a car company, Tred, that takes cars to the customer’s house instead of the customers going to the car showroom.

[15:14] The second principle discussed is 10x drivers. Strategy seems like the sexy thing. But, it doesn’t get things done. We need to strive for progress. Tamara asks Lewis how he tests and validates ideas.

[19:06] Lewis feels that the learning journey can be just as important as the positive result.

[20:52] The third daily principle they discuss is the principle of possibility seekers. It’s easy for individuals on a team to get scared. When you’re shooting for a 40% goal, there are often a lot of risks.

[21:48] It’s most important to stay positive and believe that we are the ones that could be successful. Tamara tells listeners that the thing that kills innovation is by not tapping into everyone to innovate.

[23:14] What kind of customers are using People Maven? How has using this tool changed the recruiting process? Find out why People Maven isn’t just for business recruitment.

[28:54] Tamara talks about her husband’s recent job search and the frustration that comes with the submitting the resume into the “black hole.”

[30:00] Lewis worked for Google and Microsoft in the past. The main thing he took away from his Google experience was to think big and believe that anything is achievable. From Microsoft, he learned how to build consensus and influence others.

[33:25] How can talking about a space elevator to energize your team? Tamara believes that talking about something huge warms up your innovation muscles to then apply that big thinking to other things.

[34:12] Connect with Lewis at Peoplemaven.com.

[36:09] Lewis’s parting advice is to not get fixated on the first solution that you come up with. Good inventors know that it’s not always the first idea that’s the answer to your problem. And, he challenges listeners to think about solving problems all the time.
[38:01] Tamara talks about an exercise where you shout out the first color that comes to mind. Often times, the first ideas are too close in. You need to give people time to get into the great ideas.

[39:11] Tamara challenges listeners to check out Innovation on-demand tools.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Impact Interview Homepage

Tred Homepage

People Mavens Homepage

PeopleMavens Facebook

People Mavens Blog

Sep 4, 2018

You can have the best product in the world but if the customer doesn’t feel connected to you, they don’t buy from you. And that’s why I interviewed this guy — Ryan McCarty — on Inside LaunchStreet. He is an author, speaker, and the co-founder of Culture of Good, Inc. Building upon the success of his award-winning program at TCC Verizon, Ryan and TCC Verizon CEO Scott Moorehead created Culture of Good to teach for-profit companies how to operate with the soul of a non-profit. We talk about how to scale little moments into a movement that has a lasting impact. Why companies that focus on doing good increase their employee engagement, productivity, innovation, and bottom line. It turns out that when people feel connected to a purpose, they work harder, regardless of the job. Also, consumers don’t engage with business just for the products, they want to know your story and that you do good in the world. We don’t buy transactionally, we buy relationally. How your culture is your greatest differentiator and your greatest risk.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:30] You might be surprised to know that Ryan has cut his own hair since he was twelve. In case you need a haircut, he also cuts his friends’ hair.

[4:29] Get introduced to the term “soulular work.” Ryan has always been involved to give back and felt like the for-profits were missing the feeling of connecting people to their life purpose and calling.

[8:27] Once you give employees an opportunity to do something meaningful, they know their own impact. Productivity increases and results in the business are astronomical. Ryan believes that profit and purpose don’t have to be separate.

[10:38] Ryan talks about building a culture of good in his book, Build A Culture of Good: Unleash Results by Letting Your Employees Bring Their Soul to Work. Ryan and Tamara talk about Chapter 4: Connecting moments into a movement. Ryan shares how giving away backpacks with school supplies led him to create the movement to help the employees of TCC Verizon connect their “why with their what.” This made a huge impact on the employees. You must make moments into movements, by creating a strategy of giving back and doing good. Ryan and TCC Verizon CEO Scott Moorehead, created a movement with three tiers: Big good, our good, my good. This speaks to every individual employee by connecting with the individual good, the team good and the corporate good.

[17:16] Since the launch of Culture of Good, same-store sales are up forty percent. A major part of the Culture of Good is teaching employees that their everyday work impacts the business. The business can then turn around and do more good year-to-year. Tamara challenges listeners to think about what your culture of good looks like and what your connection looks like.

[20:12] People are no longer engaging with companies solely because of the product. Ryan highlights Rosas Fresh Pizza, in Philadelphia. They have a culture of good by allowing people to pay an extra dollar, write a kind note and post it on the wall. Homeless people can then get a note off the wall and leave with a piece of pizza.

[23:10] Tamara highlights chapters 6 and 7: Making employees and customers better. Listen in as Ryan discusses the difference between transactional or relational customers. We are all customers of something. The engagement is different when you are willing to listen and care about the customer. Nothing is greater in a person’s life than when you’re serving with someone. If you can give that opportunity to a customer, they will be a customer for life.

[26:27] Listen in to find out why your culture is your greatest differentiator and also your greatest risk.

[29:13] Tamara reminds listeners not to get caught in the ‘er trap.’

[30:17] What does it mean to be emotionally disrupted? Ryan shares a personal experience and the power of the words, “I was there.”

[35:59] Tamara recently partnered up with Steves Club to help at-risk youth. Ryan feels that sharing good is contagious. It helps other people get involved.

[42:17] Profit can be an amazing catalyst for doing good. Your passion can be both profit and purpose. They can work together for synergy.

[44:46] It takes profit to make a change.

[45:21] Connect with Ryan and purchase his book at Culture of Good. Also, connect on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

[46:55] Where should LaunchStreeter’s begin to create a culture of good?

[48:19] Tamara asks listeners if they’re playing in a transactional space. It’s hard to innovate if you’re being transactional. She challenges listeners to go to Inside Launchstreet and watch the videos about customer innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Culture of Good Web Page

Culture of Good Book

Rosas Fresh Pizza

Steves Club

1