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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
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Now displaying: May, 2018
May 29, 2018

Have you ever wondered why some people are strong managers but some are strong leaders? What’s the difference? And why does having strong leaders foster a culture of innovation and having a strong manager leads to a culture of micro-managers? Fortunately for us, Art Coombs, CEO of KomBea Corporation, speaker and author of Human Connection: How the “L” do we do that? has some great experience and insights for us around this. He stopped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about the importance of the “why” and help us distinguish between managing to the head and leading to the heart. He also has some great things to say about why even the sexiest spreadsheets never move people to action.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:20] You might be surprised to learn that Art is like the modern-day Noah. He is raising two sons, two daughters and two horses.

[2:16] Art’s philosophy of strong leadership has always been to lead with the heart and manage with the mind. Listen in as he talks about the differences between management and leadership. Managers focus on the who, the how, and the when. Leaders focus on the WHY.

[5:59] Is it possible to be both a manager and a leader? Why do most true leaders possess authentic venerability? How does one become both a good manager and a leader? It all has to do with talking about the WHY.

[7:32] Art shares a personal managing failure example about his son’s homework. Art helped his son to discover the WHY in his life as they visit the local Wal-Mart at 2 A.M.

[13:08] Tamara reminds listeners that you need to give people room to self direct. In some ways, leaders have to focus on delayed gratification. Sometimes you have to do the things you need to do today for tomorrow’s benefit. Art suggests to give people the WHY and then step out of their way and they will figure out the how.

[17:46] Art and Tamara discuss why you aren’t motivated to go the extra mile until the heart is convinced that the head has it right. How does leading to the heart help to bring innovation, creativity increased productivity to the workplace? There has to be an emotional connection to the leader and those they lead.

[22:02] Art shares some tips to help create the human connection in the workplace. In this book, The Human Connection: How the L Do we Do That?, he talks about the 5 L's: Living, laughing, learning, leading, and loving. He shares a personal experience about a big mistake that he made and the response from his boss.

[27:32] Art and Tamara continue to discuss innovation. When people feel safe in their environment, innovation naturally sprouts like weeds. Art talks about how we create human connections that last. Great leaders are great cheerleaders. Communication is the key to inspiration. When you invoke an emotion, it goes straight to the heart. Art demonstrated strong leadership while working as a CEO in the call center. He used to dress up like Tarzan, and push a cookie, milk, and banana cart. Art was able to make personal emotional connections while talking to each employee.

[32:55] Art shares a story about Doyle, a worker that was consistently late for work. A co-worker helped Doyle recognize the WHY and that his behavior needed to change not only for work, but for life. Real leaders understand that we aren’t just dealing with assets. We are dealing with humans. The person at home and the person in the office are one in the same.

[36:44] Connect with Art on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or artcoombs.com.

[37:18] Art’s final piece of advice is that people don’t want to be managed, they want to be led.

[37:47] Tamara especially liked the part about how you should think about managing yourself and leading others. Help your team discover their innovation strengths by taking the IQE Assessment.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Human Connection: How The "L" Do We Do That? by Arthur F. Coombs III

KomBea

 

May 22, 2018

Do you know what’s funny? We talk about employee engagement yet no one ever says, “I feel so engaged today!” That disconnect between what we focus on and how we talk about work got me wondering how do you really engage your team? With that question in mind, I asked Cathy Brown, director of Engage For Success, to join me to talk about her perspective that engagement is a social movement, not a definition and why fitting in is killing your leadership and innovation efforts and why bringing your whole self to work should be your number one engagement priority.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:36] You might be surprised to learn that Cathy participates in moristunsa, an English traditional form of dance using bells, sticks, and handkerchiefs.

[3:01] There are many definitions of engagement. Listen in to find out how Cathy defines engagement.

[4:41] What does it mean to bring your whole self to work? What does that look like?

If you’re holding back from being who you really are, you cannot bring your best self to work. Tamara shares that her red ‘power suits’ were not allowing her to be who she really was.

[8:04] How are so many employees feeling disengaged? Cathy quotes that about 30 percent are engaged and really like their job. About 31 percent show up and think that work is OK. And, about 30 percent are totally disengaged, making themselves ill, unproductive, and exhibiting toxic behavior. She believes that the problem is that often we just don’t know what to do to change work engagement.

[10:15] The founders of Engage for Success, David MacLeod and Nita Clarke, performed research to find out what characteristics highly engaged, high performing teams possess. You can find the MacLeod report listing the four enablers of engagement here. First: There’s a strategic narrative that’s living and breathing. Employees know where they fit into the story. Acknowledge the history, the present, and where the employees fit into it. Second: Engaging managers do three things well. They can focus you on the task, trust you to deliver in your way, (they treat you as an individual) and they deal with things that come up quickly. Cathy shares a story that shows the power of managers learning each employee’s names.

[15:49] Third, employee voice, How do people feel about giving you their views? Is their voice welcomed? Do they feel safe? Tamara talks about the black hole that employee’s voices often disappear in. She reminds listeners that you don’t have to take every piece of advice, but do you need to explain what happened to the advice that was shared and why you aren’t taking the advice.

[17:44] Fourth: Organizational integrity. Understanding the values and behavior that are expected. There needs to be trust that the behavior that’s seen is congruent to the values that are exposed.

Cathy talks about Glassdoor and the importance of positive advocates on your staff.

[20:13] Cathy shares a personal story about her working in the IT industry. She understood her role and importance of her job. A good strategic narrative tells each employee WHY they are each there. Employees need to help form strategy and move the narrative forward. Tamara reminds listeners that it’s the front line staff that has lots of the most valuable information.

[23:08] Why does Cathy call engagement a movement?

[24:32] Cathy talks about the third of people that are disengaged with their job. It’s important to know how to go in and change the behavior into a more positive one.

[28:00] Find out the connection between the employees that are engaged and like their job and innovation. (8 enablers of innovation diagnostic map)... There’s a clear relationship to being able to be yourself and innovate. Tamara adds that you must be vulnerable to innovate.

[29:30] How does the culture of innovation contribute to engagement levels?

[30:22] Cathy took the IQE Assessment and her innovator archetype is ‘instinctual risk-taker.’ This means that she connects the dots in new and meaningful ways and is willing to go to new places. How have these skills helped her in her career? Cathy was willing to take problems to upper management and identify where she saw things that needed to be fixed. Tamara reminds listeners that often that means stepping up to places that others haven’t gone yet.

[35:11] Connect with Cathy, and join the newsletter at Engage for Success.

[35:33] Cathy challengers listeners to say thank you today. This is a super positive step that will help with engagement.

[35:57] Tamara believes that fitting in is killing innovation efforts. It’s so important to give people room to be different. She challenges listeners to take the IQE Assessment and then strive to accept and embrace each other’s unique differences.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

MacLeod Report

Engage for Success Homepage

IQE Assessment

 

May 15, 2018

Do you ever think to yourself, “I wish I had a super cool super talent” like an athlete or a celebrity? I know I've thought that too. Envy sets in and I start to feel inadequate. And that’s why I had Mark Henson, author of Ordinary Superpowers, lifelong entrepreneur and the founder of Sparkspace — a unique and exceptional business retreat center in Columbus, Ohio — onto Inside LaunchStreet. He broke down the “only special people” have superpowers myth. In fact, he’ll help you understand how to unlock your Ordinary Superpower. Why ordinary? Because it's probably something you do every single day. In fact, it's so hardwired into you that you may not even see it. He also will help you understand how unlocking your Ordinary Superpowers equals having a greater impact on what matters to you, the people around you. He also shares how the badge of being busy is sucking success out from under you and why living to your Ordinary Superpowers gives you a super-ordinary life.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:41] You might be surprised to know that Mark spun the tunes as a local radio DJ.

[3:40] Why did Mark title his book, Ordinary Superpowers: Unleash the Full Potential of Your Most Natural Talents? Why do we often overlook our own superpowers? To us, they just feel ordinary things like talents, abilities, and skills that allow us to help the most people.

[6:20] Mark shares his ordinary superpowers: exploring new things, simplifying things, communicating through writing and speaking, and including the unincluded.

[6:52] Listen in to find out how you discover your superpowers.

[9:04] How does identifying your superpowers change how you act day to day?

[10:47] Put your first and best efforts into the work that best fits your superpowers. Focus on the things that you have the greatest impact on. Mark shares a personal experience about domestic duties in his household. We often get into habits and don’t think to ask someone else to help out for a while.

[13:58] Mark and Tamara talk about how being busy has become a badge of honor. It leads to the monkey mind thing. The hardest thing is just to sit and ‘be.’

[16:41] Why do we get out of alignment? We have been taught what success looks like. But, often, the path doesn’t align with what our superpowers usually are. Mark shares an experience about advancing with a previous job. His advancement didn’t allow him to use his superpowers, and he was miserable.

[19:22] Superpowers are as vast as there are people in the world. Your superpowers are yours and yours alone. They are like your fingerprint. Some are unique powers like extreme organization, empathy, seeing unmet needs and acting. Tamara identifies her superpowers as being able to see opportunities, communication, seeing things differently, and simplification.

[21:37] There’s a four-part test outlined in Mark’s book that can help you determine if you have identified your unique superpowers. Does it come naturally to you? Do you have an elevated skill or talent above the circle you spend time with? Does it have a positive influence on other people in some way? Does using that power give you energy back?

[24:25] Tamara challenges listeners to buy Ordinary Superpowers, and identify what things people see as your strengths. A good way to identify your potential superpowers is to watch for areas that people ask for help.

[25:23] There’s a chapter in the book titled, “Understanding Your Default Operating System.” Mark shares that the operating system is the underlying system that keeps everything running. Mark thinks that our superpowers are the system that happens by default. Learn how there’s both a light and dark side to superpowers.

[30:19] How does tapping into your superpowers help you lead a superpowered life? It’s all about being authentic to who you are. The first step is to identify your own ordinary superpowers.

[32:15] Does everyone out there have ordinary superpowers?

[34:01] Mark shares that when you identify your authentic self, pure creativity can come out. Tamara reminds us that innovation isn’t about the outcome, it’s about the process. Mark took the IQE Assessment and his archetype is a risk taker imaginative. This helped him to start a successful business. He has reentered his risk-taking arena and continues to fill in the gaps.

[38:10] Tamara reminds listeners that you don’t have to be an ideal fit for everybody. She talks about the perspective of putting your heart and soul into creating something and compares it to the Hollywood movie making business. Tamra and Mark discuss putting your best efforts into making what makes you happy.

[40:55] Connect with Mark here, on Facebook or at A Superpowered Life.

[41:33] Mark challenges listeners to read the poem, Our deepest fear, by Maryanne Williamson. “It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you.” He believes that you will have the biggest impact by being 100 percent YOU!

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Ordinary Superpowers

Sparkspace Homepage

IQE Assessment

Superpower Summit

How I Made This Podcast

Our Deepest Fear Poem

May 8, 2018

When trying to be innovative, do you ever feel like you are just running in place, expending all this energy and not getting anywhere? It could be because you have bought into some of the prevailing innovation myths that are actually sabotaging your efforts. In today’s Q&A session on Inside LaunchStreet, we delve into the top four myths and how to avoid them. Listen in and I bet you'll find that you are probably engaging in one or several of them. No worries, after this podcast you'll get out of those innovation traps and into innovation that ignites impact.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:44] Maureen Berkner Boyt, of Moxie Exchange, asks, what are the biggest myths in innovation that we are all buying into that are sabotaging our work? Tamara believes that we are not only buying into them, but actively engaging in one or more of these myths.

[1:33] Join us on Inside LaunchStreet, as Connie Warden joins Tamara and they discuss four myths that sabotage innovation. First, you must think outside the box to be innovative. Second, innovation is for the select few. Third, innovation is for a certain time. Fourth, when you’re successful, keep doing what’s working and not innovate.

[3:44] Myth #1. You must think outside of the box to be innovative. Get introduced to Tamara’s term, ‘ridonculous’ as they talk about thinking outside of the box. Find out why innovation often goes nowhere. Connie talks about the term,”Houston, we have a problem.” Apollo 13, is a great example of thinking inside the box, shifting and rearranging what you already have.

[6:21] Tamara highlights examples of companies who have shifted and rearranged successfully. Anythink Libraries, has become a place of discovery. They have elevated the library experience.

[11:02] Tamara shares the book, How The Cadillac Got Its Fins: And Other True Tales from the Annals of Business and Marketing, by Jack Mingo. She tells about the successful rise of Greyhound Bus. Connie and Tamara discuss the image of taking public transport and the importance of flipping the box to bring public transport back into popularity. Domino’s Pizza successfully rearranged the box by owning their problems and innovating.

[15:18] Myth #2 Innovation is for the select few, Connie talks about her friend, Keith. He helped his dentist innovate while sitting in the dentist’s chair. The IQE ASsessment was created to bring to dispel the myth that only a select few can innovate. Connie’s IQE is a tweaker, continually making little shifts, until innovation is successful. Tamara’s IQE is an experiential risk taker. That means that she innovates by being uncomfortable. She must build things, to see things. It’s so important to work within your innovation strengths.

[19:47] Connie brings up the idea that most people want to conform. Humans want to be liked, so we conform too much. She shares her experience of a flight attendant. She could tell how people would behave depending on what city they were flying out of. It’s important to bring awareness to the role that we are currently in. Tamara challenges listeners to let everyone innovate in a way that works for them. Leaders need to motivate the team to show courage to innovate in their own way.

[23:29] Myth #3 Innovation is for a certain time. Tamara thinks that innovation is a mindset, it is not a point and time exercise. Our best ideas may already be created. We just need to find them. Tamara shares a personal story about the roadblocks of getting through her ‘to do’ list. In the process of working through the list, she had shut her creative brain down. We need to validate our brains and continually prime the pump.

[28:57] Intuition doesn’t happen just between 8-5. Connie shares an experience about buying coffee for her kids. It’s important to take the intuition from your mind and just deal with it. Tamara reminds us that when intuition flows, it flows. She has a small bucket on her desk that she uses to store her intuition. Be open to listening to your intuition.

[34:49] Myth #4 When you’re successful, keep doing what’s working and not innovate. Connie and Tamara discuss the demise of Sears, Kodak, Blockbuster, Radio Shack, Blackberry, Pan Am, and KMart. These were all once leaders in their category. The marketplace changed and shifted, and these companies did not. Connie chimes in that things are changing at a much quicker rate than before. Tamara share the success of Starbucks and that they recognized that they were getting complacent. You cannot rest on your success.

[38:02] Do you need to be constantly changing and innovating as humans?

Is it possible to change too much?

[40:45] Tamara recaps the four myths of innovation.

[42:00] Tamara challenges listeners to visit the blog and look for the ways you can engage today in smart innovation practices.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Moxie Exchange Webpage

IQE Assessment

May 1, 2018

I was sitting in the common area of the WeWork, where we office, and I overheard the most fascinating conversation. They were talking about how they were struggling because it felt like nothing was behind the curtain in business anymore, that the customer wanted to know everything about you — not just if you had a good product or service, but everything — the good, the bad, and definitely the ugly. And you know what, they are right. Transparency is a must if a business wants to thrive. So, that’s why I asked Billee Howard to come on Inside LaunchStreet and share her insights. She is the author of We Commerce — an incredible book about the new economy and Founder + CEO of BRANDthropologie Media, a firm identifies the most powerful collision point of culture and commerce for each client to create captivating story-driven experiences that drive emotional and authentic engagement. I think you’ll find our discussion — around what it looks like to thrive in the We Economy and why having a purpose is as important as a product — valuable. I thought our convo about why the heart matters more than the mind was super insightful.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:24] You might be surprised to know that Billee creates in the kitchen while listening to the music that a seventy-year-old man would enjoy.

[3:51] Billee specializes in harnessing creativity to solve business problems. How is using creativity different in solving problems?

[5:26] Find out why Billee believes that storytelling and creativity are the currency of business in the new economy.

[7:24] Listen is as Billee talks about the ‘me’ to the ‘we’ shift in business strategies. Get introduced to Billee’s definition of a ‘we’ economy.

[9:30] Why is storytelling more important than ever? People no longer want to have just transactions with brands. They want to have interactions and experiences. Tamara reminds listeners that it’s easy to get the transaction done, but you have to be more thoughtful to build an interaction.

[12:04] Why do businesses often stop short of emotional satisfaction? Billee shares that Seventh Generation is delivering on their business purpose. They are leaving the world better than they found it for seven generations to come. Tom's Shoes is also hitting it out of the park with the meaningful interaction they play in the community.

[15:25] Is there a connection to your team internalizing your business purpose and bringing creative ideas to the table? Culture is everything today.

[18:09] Tamara shares that Inside Launchstreet holds a quarterly campfire where they eat S'mores and share stories. This has created a powerful ‘we’ culture.

[19:47] Billee talks about using the power of technology with the creativity side of marketing. There is a tremendous amount of opportunity to connect customer emotion to brand performance. Brands have a fifty percent increased likelihood of achieving the desired outcome if they infuse emotions into the process. Empathy is a critical component in everything that you put forward to the world.

[22:04] Tamara talks about growing up in a workplace where emotions were checked in at the door. She shares a story about her friend experiencing a powerful negative emotional reaction to a brand. Billee believes that business can no longer remain emotionless. Consumers want a brand to believe in.

[25:21] How do you drive engagement with your customer’s heart?

[27:00] Brands have become emotionally illiterate. People have not had a need for emotional literacy. Tamara and Billee talk about both Pepsi and Dove faux pas.

[29:13] Businesses consult Billee when they realize that purpose is no longer a marketing ploy. Purpose is a critical thing that needs to define a company’s future. The goal is to best capture customer emotion and connect with it in a way that’s going to really drive performance.

[31:31] Find out how did Billee became an IBM futurist. Tamara thinks that Billee’s archetype is instinctual collaborative on the IQE Assessment.

[33:49] Connect with Billie at Brandthropologie, on LinkedIn, and on Twitter.

[34:11] Billee introduces her book, We Commerce. She believes that you must have an appetite for change and disruption in order to be successful. Collaboration must be a part of business strategy. To be the best in the world, you must constantly push yourself to a place that you are uncomfortable.

[36:00] Tamara reminds listeners that ‘we’ commerce is not a flavor of the month. It’s how we should be doing business. Your purpose should be infused in everything that you do.

[37:30] Tamara asks listeners to write a review on iTunes if you find value in listening to InsideLaunchstreet.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Brandthropologie Homepage

We Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy,
by Billee Howard

Centiment

1