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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
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Now displaying: March, 2018
Mar 27, 2018

Did you know that you need to spend time with people you don’t agree with? It’s not always easy, but it will help you be more innovative and make better decisions. Jennifer Riel, author of Creating Great Choices, and an adjunct professor at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, specializing in creative problem solving, stopped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about all this. We dig into how to challenge our own thinking with the opposite views of others and why people with different perspectives help us get to more rich and robust ideas. She also shares the key to better decision making, including Integrative Thinking, creating more tension and why seeking to fall in love with other people’s perspectives is the best thing you can do.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:54] You might be surprised to know that Jennifer is a Canadian that has never played hockey. However, she has fallen on her behind many times curling.

[2:57] Jennifer finds meaningful value in spending time with people that see the world differently than you. You mind forms incomplete models. The only way you have a hope of challenging your thinking and improving your model is by talking to people that don’t see what you see. It’s a valuable way to learn and make your own thinking richer and more robust.

[5:04] Jennifer shares a personal story about teaching a group of healthcare leaders that resulted in opposite views regarding vaccines.

[8:10] Why is it hard for us to internalize opposing, provocative, differing views?

[10:19] Learn the keys to better decision making and get introduced to the term ‘integrative thinking,’ Learn how to create great choices rather than to choose between existing options.

[12:13] How do you know when the solutions on the table are the right options? How can your emotional reaction propel you to continue to seek other options? Tamara reminds LaunchStreet listeners that if you feel like you’re compromising or settling, that’s when you keep seeking.

[14:21] Start looking at other options by diving into the most opposing of the choices in front of you. Then, seek to fall in love with the options. Ask yourself, what would be truly great with each of the options? Look at decentralization and then centralization. The more tension you can produce, the greater insight you will receive.

[17:21] Jennifer believes that many times we limit our emotional selves in business. Falling in love with the model means that you go beyond finding the good in the model. Tamara teaches that ‘leaving emotions at the door’ works against us. Humans add value through emotion and innovation.

 

 

[20:51] When we fall in love, we get to see why it’s valuable and the benefits the model provides. Tamara challenges listeners to complete an exercise and unpack the ‘what.’

[22:42] Are best practices always best?

[25:49] Tamara questions if we focus on best practices because it gives us an anchor to start with. Jennifer breaks best practices into two categories: heuristic and algorithmic. You need to loosen things up a bit to embrace the intention.

[29:01] Jennifer shares some surprises she experienced while about writing her book, Creating Great Choices: A Leader's Guide to Integrative Thinking, by Jennifer Riel and Roger L. Martin.

[31:11] How do you get the people at the table to get on board? Jennifer thinks it’s powerful to demonstrate your own willingness to question your own model first. If we are genuinely curious fairly consistently, cognitive bias starts to work for us.

[34:35] Connect with Jennifer at Rogerlmartin.com,

Rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/Faculty/FacultyBios/RielJennifer, and on Twitter

[34:59] Jennifer shares why it is important to focus on great choices. Listen in as Jennifer defines strategy. Jennifer challenges listeners to think about how you define your job in regards to choices. Do you see yourself as one who is able to take the raw materials the world gives you and create innovative ideas?

[36:00] Tamara has learned that creative conflict is essential yet it can go bad fast. You need to set the stage in a way that avoids the traps. Go to Innovation on Demand to learn how to create constructive criticism.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

Mentioned in This Episode:

Creating Great Choices: A Leader's Guide to Integrative Thinking, by Jennifer Riel and Roger L. Martin

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion,
by Jonathan Haidt

Good To Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't, by Jim Collins

Mar 20, 2018

Let's get real for a moment. Have you ever had an idea that you thought was brilliant? Maybe it would make a massive impact on your bottom line. Or maybe it would solve your company's biggest challenges? So many of us have had those ideas. So what did you do with it? Did you shove it deep down into the recesses of your mind because you didn't have the time or energy to pursue it? Did you rush to present it to those key stakeholders and they shot it down before it could even breath life? So many of our ideas die early before they've even hit daylight. So that got me thinking… why… why do so many ideas hit the graveyard so early? And with that question in my mind, I asked Mark Aramli, the inventor of BedJet® to come onto Inside LaunchStreet. He has taken a simple idea for keeping your bed at just the right temperature and turned it into a massive business.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:38] You might be surprised to learn that Mark is the world’s biggest supernerd. His favorite sci-fi show is Doctor Who.

[3:46] Mark shares his experimental journey through founding BedJet. The first BedJet® was designed on his kitchen table.

[6:15] Listen in to find out the magic formula Mark has used to compete with the big dogs to create a superior product and end up with the number-one-ranked product in its class.

[10:33] Tamara talks about her uncomfortable personal story about using a heating blanket. The BedJet® can create a sauna-like heat in sixty seconds.

[12:20] Mark has learned that you don’t need million dollar budgets to create new products and services.

[14:45] Mark believes that there’s no upside to biding your time. Time and time again, the value of the idea is meaningless unless you act upon it. He shares a case study about filing patents for BedJet®. The value is not really in the idea, it’s a warehouse full of products that you can sell.

[17:36] Why is the chasm so large from idea to testing viability? Mark feels that most people just don’t know the first steps to run the process. There are both a knowledge and a money gap. The biggest piece of advice he can give entrepreneurs is to hang on to your day job as long as you possibly can. It’s a big mistake to jump all the way in.

[21:30] Should you pursue all of your “aha” moments? Mark and Tamara discuss Mark’s Shark Tank experience. Mark reminds listeners that the only opinion that matters is the paying customers that open their wallets to buy it. You must validate with customers. Tamara shares the inception of Tough Mudder.

[25:40] Mark was not prepared that the Shark Tank would instantly hate his product. Even so, the takeaway was hugely positive. The episode aired the week he started shipping BedJet®. Mark believes that it’s imperative to have a thick skin and an internal well of persistence and resilience to start a successful business.

[30:05] Tamara’s dad gave her some powerful advice. “Remember when you’re up, that you were once down. And, remember when you’re down, that you were once up.”

[30:36] What’s in the future for BedJet®? Mark’s advises that it’s very dangerous to be a one trick pony.

[32:53] Tamara asks LaunchStreeters to think about how they can get a BedJet® and what formula they are developing to do things differently than the competition.

[33:26} Connect with Mark at BedJet.com and at info@bedjet.com.

[33:45] Get introduced to the three pizza rule. Find out why Mark follows the one pizza rule.

[34:42] Mark leaves LaunchStreeters with his top piece of advice: Seek the customer’s validation. Friends and family are a bit biased. Tamara talks about renting a mall kiosk, it's a great way to gather feedback.

[37:04] Tamara asks listeners what you are going to do today to bring your ideas to life and get feedback. Go to Innovation on Demand to help bring your ideas to light.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

The Art of War, by Sun Tzu

How To Be Awesome at Your Job Podcast

BedJet Homepage

Mar 13, 2018

Yesterday someone told me the saddest thing. They said that their boss told them, and I quote, “You need to be more creative. I’m not sure what that means but I know you need more of it.” Ummm, hello — how are you supposed to improve something when you don‘t even know what it means. How will you know if you are successful? No clue. And that’s why I invited Tina Seeling, a Professor of the Practice in Stanford University and author of the book Creativity Rules, to have a convo on Inside LaunchStreet. You’ll appreciate our conversation around instead of going directly to solutions, taking time to reframe the problem and her feeling that ideas are free, not cheap … and other creative exercises to spark new thinking.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:56] You might be surprised to know that Tina is using New Yorker magazine covers to create collages.

[4:40] Tamara reminds Lauchstreeters that you don’t need to be good at art, you just need to do it and have some fun with it.

[6:29] Part of unlocking creativity is about getting out of your routine and habit. It allows you to connect and combine things in really interesting ways.

[7:16] Tina is a neuroscientist by training but she believes that it all comes down to creative problem-solving. Every trade needs the tools for creative problem-solving.

[8:27] Our school system is not tuned to stimulate creativity, partly because it’s hard to measure. Tamara points out that we often try to measure things when they aren’t there. Tamara and Tina have a discussion around the equation 5 + 5 and where the creativity happens in solving this problem.

[11:40] Tina teaches that the questions you ask are the frame into which the answers will fall. If you don’t ask the right question, you won’t create the space to come up with the solutions. Tina shares examples on how to reframe the questions. Get introduced to the term, “framestorm.”

[15:06] Tamara shares Dollar Shave Clubs example of reframing the question. The owner was asking the forward-thinking question, how do I make the shaving experience hassle-free?

[16:02] Tina explains that creative ideas are new to you. Innovative ideas are new to the world. Defining creativity helps you to push past the idea and help you to innovate.

You have to have shared vocabulary and to share the foundation. Tina defines in her book, Creativity Rules, important shared vocabulary. Imagination: envisioning things that don’t exist. Creativity: applying your imagination to address some sort of challenge. Innovation: applying the creativity to come up with a solution. Entrepreneurship: applying creativity to scale and bringing it to the world. Tina calls this the invention cycle because the end leads back to the beginning.

[19:00] How do leaders get the invention cycle moving? Why do you need both an attitude and and action?

[20:25] Tina teachers the different stages of the invention cycle: imagination, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneuring. Learn how Khan Academy was born.

[25:16] Tamara shares her recent weight loss story. Her focus was on things she can do every single day, instead of an exact number to reach. By reframing her goal, she was able to see success. Often, it’s the little things that help to create success. Focus on changing the one percent. Over time, the compounding value is so great.

[29:17] Tina believes that when you get a job, you don’t get a job. You get the keys to the building. Observe all areas in which you can contribute. Tamara reminds LaunchStreeters that today’s job is not about what they hired you to do. You must push forward, this will allow you to creatively problem solve.

[30:44] Tina took the archetype assessment, IQE, and her power triggers are imaginative instinctual. The imaginative side is all about novel ideas, things from scratch. Tina’s reframing and the one percent fit this type to a T. The instinctual connect the dots in new and meaningful ways. Tina reminds us that we all can stretch and get better through creative exercises. She talks about the Six Thinking Hats and how each hat is required in the conversation and helps us problem solve.

[36:12] Find out why you need both “yes anders and yes butters.” Tina teaches that it’s important to know when in the process to engage the black hat “yes butters.”

[37:20] What is the hardest part of the cycle? Coming up with the ideas or the implementation? Ideas are not cheap, they’re free. The creativity is woven through the entire process. It isn’t a one-time thing.

[39:16] Tina and Tamara provide ways to brainstorm new ideas and open the door to new solutions.

[42:04] Connect with Tina on Twitter, and on her webpage.

[42:31] Tina challenges listeners to engage today! Do something different, really pay attention. Spend an hour observing and look for interesting opportunities to unfold.

[43:04] Tamara reminds listeners that the first step of innovation is being empowered. Take the IQE Assessment today to help you get started!

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Creativity Rules: Get Ideas Out of Your Head and into the World, by Tina Seelig

IQE Assessment

Six Thinking Hats

Tina's webpage

 

Mar 6, 2018

Do you ever think to yourself, “Wait, that worked for so and so that had the same challenge, why didn't it work for me?” I just had that experience yesterday with something I was working on. WTF right? And I think this is especially true when we are dealing with big challenges. I think part of that is the difference between being having change happen to you, and actually being a change leader. And that’s why I had Andy Sheppard, author of The Incredible Transformation of Gregory Todd, and a well-known expert in the area of helping organizations craft constructive change and to be leaders in change as well on Inside LaunchStreet. The conversation is all about change leadership and what it takes to get it done.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:24] You might be surprised to know that Andy can insert a credit card into his mouth, both widthwise and depthwise.

[3:31] Why is managing change such an important skill right now?

[4:24] Andy believes that we can’t implement sustained change unless we know how to lead it. Andy’s specialty is extreme change, requiring both behavioral change and system change.

[8:06] Is change about managing through a specific change or about finding a way to leverage change in an ongoing way?

[9:05] Tamara reminds LaunchStreeters to identify change that is connected. It makes a difference when you take your role and figure out how to connect the dots. You must be looking at the connected whole.

[10:03] Andy believes that a pitfall we get into is trying to emulate what we observe rather than applying the principles of our own situation. Read about this in How To Become The Toyota of Your Industry. This can often create more problems than you can solve. Tamara reminds LaunchStreeters to put other’s best practices into your own context and take the principles out of them and not necessarily the tactics.

[13:51] Andy shares that a good change leader is able to look at the physical practices but also unseen changes. You also need to look at principles and have a process that is guided by your principles. The right roles and responsibilities of who’s leading the change must be examined. Andy highlights an experience about how a CEO’s questions set him up for successful change.

[17:24] How does the culture determine if change will be successful?

[20:26] Tamara cautions LaunchStreeters and those leading change not to rush into it. Think about how it’s going to impact others not only today but down the road.

[23:46] Listen in to find out why you need some sense of urgency in change. How does inertia kill our change efforts?

[25:08] Andy took the IQE Assessment to determine his innovator archetype. His archetype is experiential futuristic. Experiential learners learn in motion. You innovate by doing. Futuristic is all about tomorrow. You are ten steps down the road. Andy is great about change management because he’s all about doing but also thinking about the implications of change.

[28:03] Andy’s book, The Incredible Transformation of Gregory Todd, is a business book written as a novel. This helps you to be immersed in a situation so that you can go apply everything in a live environment.

[31:01] Andy hopes that readers of his book come away with a flavor of what it means to lead change and practice everything together.

[33:42] Connect with Andy at AJSheppard.com and on Linkedin.com/in/ajsheppardchangeleadership.

[34:07] Andy advises LaunchStreeters to be prepared to unlearn everything you already know about change. Challenge your own assumptions. He shares a personal experience about managing change.

[37:53] Tamara reminds listeners that you can all be change leaders. Look at the blogs and podcasts on LaunchStreet.com to get started.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

The Incredible Transformation of Gregory Todd: A Novel about Leadership and Managing Change, by A J Sheppard

The 48 Laws of Power, by Robert Greene

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