Info

Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
RSS Feed
Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game
2019
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: September, 2017
Sep 26, 2017

Matthew Bertulli is the master of the changing retail landscape. He is the Co-Founder & CEO of Demac Media, an award-winning Commerce Agency and brings several of his own innovative products to market. He stopped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about the massive shifts in retail that are killing the big dogs and presenting massive opportunities for entrepreneurs and those willing to think differently.

Key Takeaways:

[1:14] Matthew explains that big shifts are happening in the retail world. Digital technology is making it much easier to disrupt the traditional consumer chain. Northface is making huge gains with 40% of their revenue being sold directly to the consumer.

[4:09] Tamara shares her recent shopping experience to her local mall. Most retail stores were devoid of customers. The stores that did have customers were the Apple Store, the Peloton Bike Shop, and the Tesla store.

[6:50] The retail shift has given entrepreneurs a prime chance to take on the monster retailers and CPG companies. How do I begin? The day of the order taker is gone,  There’s never been a better time to enter the market.

[8:35] Tamara shares the example of Diamond and Sparkle. They have over a million followers! It’s never been easier to get in front of the people that want to follow you.  Opening up a market or building your own has never been easier.

[11:12] How can entrepreneurs take advantage of this retail shift? Matthew introduces his product, Pelacase and how his company is eliminating supply chains and turnaround times. Matthew and team innovated the product but also the business model of a lightning-quick turnaround time.

[14:20] What tradeoffs did Matthew’s company have to accept for the quick turnaround time? Tamara advises that you have to think about what you have to give up versus what you want to get.

[17:20] Listen in as Matthew shares some mistakes that retailers often make. One: They go at it backward. Two: They’re going in with what’s good for them instead of going into it with a win-win situation. Build your own audience and find out who your audience is.  Tell a different story by arming yourself with your data that supports the retailer’s business.

[21:55] Demac Media, Matthew’s business, is partnered with Shopify. They create more economic value than they capture for themselves. Shopify captures 30-40% of the value that they create. Listen in to learn how you can create more value than you capture.

[24:16] Matthew believes that ecommerce is going to turn the retail markets on its head and capture 25% of the market globally in the next five-to-eight years. Data is becoming like gold. Think of the opportunity in the shift. Entrepreneurs are sitting on a gold pile!

[26:36] Tune in to find out how Matthew’s local grocery store has created brand loyalty by teaching customers how to make smoothies and eat healthily!

[28:22] Matthew shares what brands he feels are doing well online. It’s important to remember that successful brands aren’t always billion dollar industries. Your chance of building a really great $10 million business is so much better now than ten years ago.

[31:00] Media often preys on fear and money. The Podcasts movement is great because it is exposing the many success stories of base hit entrepreneurs.

[33:34] Matthew started Demac Media to help merchants build and grow ecommerce businesses. In this process, they have started and acquired their own brands. He shares success from a Canadian company called Cuddlebug. Turnaround time on decisions is ten minutes. This is intoxicating! The retail shift is going to favor the small and the nimble, not the large.

[36:45] One of the reasons Matthew decided to go vertical and have their own brands is that it gives them an edge. It’s powerful to be in the market and experience actionable data that we have tried ourselves.

[37:48] How does Matthew juggle and balance it all? How does he put his own products in the market and help others do it?

[40:58] Connect with Matt.

 

If you are ready to:

Sep 19, 2017

Jay Samit is the man behind the TED talk, “Disrupt YOU,” and the creator of the Disrupt YOU workbook and has raised millions of dollars for disruptive startups. We chat about how to disrupt yourself, why you can either create disruption or be disrupted, and how people willing to let go of how they do things today are the ones that are going to shake up the world on Inside LaunchStreet.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:30] How are innovation and disruption different? Listen in to find out how Indiana Jones disrupts and changes all of the incremental advances.

[2:48] Listen in to find out how technology is increasing the rate of disruption.

Jay believes that whether by choice or circumstance, every career gets disrupted.

[4:52] Forty-seven percent of U.S. jobs will disappear in the next decade. The only defense you possess is how you respond to the disruption. Uniqueness comes when we realize the changes to society and how we leverage them for personal advantage.

[7:13] Why should I disrupt myself and how do I proceed? The first step is to change yourself and the image you see of yourself. It’s not about changing the world. List the problems you have in your life and begin to see them as opportunities to change your life and the life of others. Jay shares a story about two kids living in Tel Aviv that created the WAZE app.

[10:32] Silly Putty, Playdough, and Slinky were all created as innovators began to look at things differently and sought out opportunity. Tamara challenges her listeners to accept Jay’s 30-day challenge of writing down your problems in a notebook and identifying problems that you can innovate and change things for the better.

[14:40] Tamara shares that sometimes when we look at problems, we believe that it’s too simple. It’s important to remember that problems compound.

[15:42] The consequence of not disrupting guarantees that we will be roadkill. Don’t wait for something bad to happen.

[18:14] Jay believes that the risk you don’t take will be your biggest regret.

[19:13] Failing and failure are not the same thing. Find out how they are different. Jay shares how the dating site, Tune In, Hook UP, evolved to YouTube and Airbnb was born from the idea of renting out air mattresses.

[21:19] Jay shares how endless innovation has contributed to the thinking that consumers are no longer buying things to last forever. Change is the new normal, and the only person that can stop you is you.

[25:47] How does the ripple effect play into disruption? It’s imperative to get ahead of the ripples.

[28:51] Listen in to find out what things are shifting that can create opportunities.

Find out how big businesses invention can benefit you.

[33:10] Jay expounds on his nugget of advice, “It’s not the job of people living in the past to understand the future. It’s your job to communicate your vision in a way that people living in the past can comprehend.” Start living in a way that you can explain it to them and you’ll see progress.

[34:58] Click here to get started on your journey to disrupt yourself! Order Jay’s free 40-page workbook and listen to Jay’s “Disrupt You,” TED talk.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Jay's Home Page 

Jay's Facebook Page

 

Sep 12, 2017

Jeff DeGraff knows what makes someone innovative — it’s in the code. He is the author of The Innovation Code: The Creative Power of Constructive Conflict, and a leader and teacher of innovation. He chatted with me on Inside LaunchStreet for a discussion on the four types of innovation approaches, why so many leaders give lip service to innovation, and how conflict fosters great ideas.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:12] Why do leaders often have an “empty playbook” when it comes to innovations?

[3:52] Jeff explains how you can maintain equilibrium versus being deviant. It’s important to remember that one size doesn’t fit all in innovation; it’s highly situational.  Tamara compares this to a teeter-totter analogy. Listen in to learn how you can successfully balance the teeter-totter.

[6:53] Tamara believes that radical innovation often gets thrown under the bus. Jeff believes that the problem isn’t failure, the problem is success. The issue is believing in what you’re actually getting back from the market. Innovation gets squashed in the teeter-totter going from the innovation end to the optimization end.

[9:08] How can the innovation code bust down the innovation brick wall? Innovation rule is the 20/80 rule. Imagine a bell curve and imagine when do you really change? People change when they have to. Innovation happens from the outside in. Innovation is about conflict.

[10:55] In Jeff’s book, The Innovation Code, he explains that innovation happens when conflict/contrast is introduced. The death of innovation is apathy. It’s important to understand that diversity is not a democratic process, everybody’s voice doesn’t count the same. Learn about the positive hum of generative energy.

[13:42] Good (smart) conflict isn’t about personalities, it’s about ideas. Recognize that the debate is about the idea, not the personality.

[15:18] Tamara shares a personal story regarding avoiding conflict when she worked with a beverage company. Jeff believes you don’t have to avoid safe spaces and trigger words. You don’t have to agree with people. Social media is driving this belief that fosters monological thinking.

[17:21] Jeff suggests that if you’re engaged in a conflict, you need move the idea away from the personality and generate ideas in ways that people don’t feel threatened. The object is to make people see their blind spots. Constructive conflict is your idea about something. A powerful question to ask is, “But, have you thought about this?”

[18:24] Listen in to learn the million dollar question to ask after introducing a new idea.

[19:29] How do leaders move the team forward? Jeff suggest that you partner people with their opposites, and ask them for hybrid ideas. Then, work backwards and look at the causes of the outcome.

[21:56] Jeff expounds on two of his worldview personalities: Artsy and Engineer.

Think of Lennon vs. McCartney. Innovation is not born from freedom. It’s born from constraints.

[26:26] Tamara shares that these opposite pairs must share a common thread that propels them forward to success.

[27:17] Jeff continues to share his worldview personalities of Athlete and Sage.

[29:50] Your dominant worldview is your strength but also your weakness. You have to learn how to live with it, incorporate it.

[31:42] How can I use the worldviews to help me innovate? Make people aware, without belittling them, when they are in the negative zone and then walk them out of the zone.

[33:32] Jeff explains which worldview personality fits best into different phases of innovation. All four types need to be represented in all four phases.

[35:54] How can organizations avoid assigning innovation to the “special shirt” team? What playbook is successful?

[38:24] Jeff challenges listeners to think that innovation requires generative energy. Energy is created when you surround yourself with people that don’t believe what you do. He also challenges them to dive into conflict.

[40:34] The whole process of being a leader is making sense of things. Strong leadership can pinpoint insights. Jeff feels like the biggest thing that’s currently changing are social issues. First: Starting in 2014, over half of the births born to women under the age of 30 are outside of marriage. Second, people want to work for themselves. And, third, the fastest growing religion of people under 30 is atheism.

[42:46] Tamara shares an experience while on vacation that shows just how much purchase behavior has evolved with the generations.

[44:18] Connect with Jeff at  JeffDeGraff.com, and watch his Jeff-ism videos. Buy his book, The Innovation Code, and take a free assessment to determine what worldview personality you are.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

The Innovation Code: The Creative Power of Constructive Conflict, by Jeff DeGraff
and Staney DeGraff

Innovatrium.org

Watch Jeff explain the Competing Values Framework

 

Sep 5, 2017

David Fradin knows how to create questions to inspire innovation. He is the creator of the S.P.I.C.E method, and has 45-plus years of product and marketing experience, and is responsible for over 75 products, representing $250M in revenue. He pops over to Inside LaunchStreet to talk about how asking the wrong questions kills our innovation efforts, why lacking process creates a culture of blame, and how to use S.P.I.C.E to move ideas forward.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:15] David shares his successful key ingredient as a product innovator. He believes it is focusing on what the customer wants to do: why, when, where, and how they want to do it. As well as the question, what is unsatisfactory with the current process?

[2:58] Find out why knowing the why, and what is unsatisfactory, is so crucial in product innovation. David discusses the urban fable of Henry Ford asking people if they want a car. The answer might have been, “I don’t want a car, I want a faster horse.” Ford should have asked, Would you like to go from point A to point B faster?

[5:07] How do we move from asking the wrong questions to asking the right questions?

[9:07] David’s definition of innovation is helping people do what they want to do faster, cheaper, or with style. Tamara encourages intrapreneurs and entrepreneurs to recollect if you are helping your consumers do what they want to do.

[11:24] David shares his experience of bringing the new concept of the Apple ProFile (a hard disc on a PC) to market.

[14:00] How do you combat the resistance of a new product and get past Newton’s First Law of Motion?

[18:10] Why it’s important to do the do: do the innovation and define the value proposition first. Then, market research and competitive research, market segmentation, total available market, and prospect of journey, sales, trading plans, and identify metrics of success. Then, you start development.

[20:15] David walks us through figuring out what your customers do: First, observe who, what, where, when, why, and how. Second, develop an interview questionnaire searching for how satisfied they are for getting something done now. This will help you prioritize your opportunity based on a formula between what they want to do, and what their satisfaction is in getting the thing done. Find the formula in David’s book, Building Insanely Great Products. Third, is a format for writing a value proposition. The template for writing the value proposition can be found here at David's ecourse.

[23:02] Get introduced to the mnemonic S.P.I.C.E S. Strategy, Process, Information, Customer, Employees, Systems and Tools, in order to build insanely great products.

[26:00] Find out why the lack of process creates a culture of blame, and hinders success and innovation.

[29:58] Tamara shares the importance of team collaboration up and downstream from what you do. This will help you get the whole vision.

[31:28] Tamara shares her personal experience about going to the mall. The mall had very few customers except for the Apple Store, Tesla Store and Peloton Bike Store. David shares a story about Steve Jobs and his vision with his first stores.The successful experience all goes back to observing what people do.

[35:54] Tamara believes the question retail stores need to be asking is, how can I create an experience for our customers? Decisions need to be based on the customers and what they want.

[39:07] Connect with David at SpiceCatalyst.com, on LinkedIn or Dave@spicecatalyst.com.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Foundations in the Successful Management of Products: A Must Have Guide for Todays Product Managers and Product Teams, by David Fradin

Building Insanely Great Products: Some Products Fail, Many Succeed... This is their Story: Lessons from 47 years of experience including Hewlett-Packard, Apple, 75 products, and 11 startups later, by David Fradin

 

1