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Inside LaunchStreet

This innovation podcast will resonate with those that recognize that being more innovative is their ticket to being indispensable and for leaders of all levels under pressure to build a culture of innovation. A blend of insightful interviews, audience questions, spotlights, and an occasional rant, your host Tamara Ghandour brings a fresh perspective to innovation. As the author of Innovation Is Everybody's Business and the creator of the Innovation Quotient Edge assessment, Tamara makes innovation accessible to all of us in this conversational style podcast.
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Now displaying: 2020
Aug 4, 2020

Are you struggling with time management? Do you feel like you never have enough time to cross off all the things on your ‘to-do’ list, and start being innovative? Trust me, you’re not alone, and I have some tips for you to start managing your time better.

Time management is internally driven. Particularly when it feels like others are sucking our time, the responsibility lies on us to manage our own time to make things easier and less stressful by allowing more time and mental space back into our day. That’s where priority management comes in.

We may think that categorizing tasks into marketing, strategy, finances, etc. can help, but it doesn't necessarily move us forward — and it didn’t help me get things done. We often mistake checking things off a list with real productivity that moves things forward, but what we need to be doing is prioritizing tasks that really make an impact. When I realized that time management is really about priority management, my world changed. Ask yourself: What's the ONE Thing you can do such that by doing it everything else will be easier or unnecessary?

When you ask yourself that question every day, you’ll be on your way to managing your time so much better.

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Leadership and Innovation Community with Tamara Ghandour Facebook Group

Innovation is Everybodys Business, by Tamara Ghandour

Everyday Innovator's Tribe

The One Thing, by Gary Keller

 

Jul 28, 2020

A question I often get is, “How do I know when I should collaborate and when I shouldn’t?” In our current work-from-home situations, a lot of us may be suffering from collaboration fatigue from being on virtual meetings all the time, which makes us feel like we’re “collaborating” all day long without seeing any real benefit of these meetings. That’s why it is important for us to consider not just when, but how we should be collaborating.

 

The thing is, we tend to confuse meetings with actual collaboration. However, we need to be thinking about when collaboration is appropriate and how we want to do it. I share an experience I had from working in corporate, and how my team came up with the four reasons we would use to drive our collaboration — to brainstorm, to build, to debate, and to decide. I explain why these four reasons are the keys to knowing when and how we should collaborate in our teams to drive innovative solutions, to problem solve, and to create better outcomes for the team and the organization.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

8 Strategies Highly Innovative Business Leaders Are Using Now to Bring Value to Their Organizations

Jul 21, 2020

How many of us have used the convenient excuse of “they” for our mistakes or failures? “They” didn’t get it, “they” rejected the plan, “they” didn’t give me the tools I needed to succeed. We’ve all done it, but it is so counterproductive to innovation and creates a toxic culture of blame, and this is bad for not just innovation but also company culture.

In the last of a four-part interview series where amazing business leaders interview me about innovation, Kris Boesch, the CEO and Founder of Choose People, a company that supports organizations in solving challenging people problems, dons the interviewer’s hat. Together, we dig into why we get caught up in pushing blame to others, and how to overcome ‘they’ syndrome.

Words and the language we use are incredibly powerful. Kris and I explore the power of the word “they” and how this can put the brakes on our innovation efforts. In order to innovate, we need accountability and ownership, but the word “they” keeps us in the trap of blame pushing. I share some examples of when this evolved into a toxic company culture, and how simply removing it from the vocabulary can lead to immense mindset shifts. The word “they” is also critical when it comes to communicating ideas and how we communicate our innovation can force us into an us-vs.-them situation, rather than a ‘we’ situation. The truth is, ideas can’t stand on their own without being properly communicated to others — and I share some of my tips for proactively dealing with people’s obstacles and challenges, just by changing your language.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Kris Boesch, Choose People

David Marquet

Turn The Ship Around!, by David Marquet

Strategies to Get Legacy Thinkers Behind Innovation

Inside Launch Street Podcast Episode 1906: “Debate Ideas, Not People

 

 

Jul 14, 2020

We all know that everyone thinks differently, but did you know that male and female brains are actually wired differently from a neurological perspective? That’s why men and women think differently and it can have very significant impacts on how we relate to one another in the workplace. Kate Lanz joins us on this episode to dive into the science behind our gendered brains, and how we can tap into that to drive innovation.

Kate Lanz is the founder and CEO of Mindbridge, a UK-based global leadership company specializing in the power of modern neuroscience and releasing latent brain potential. She is also a trained neuropsychologist who works as a leadership coach and organizational psychologist. Her new book, All the Brains in the Business: The Engendered Brain in the 21st Century Organisation, dives into brain gender difference and how it impacts the workplace.

What are the differences between female and male brains from a science perspective and how does that show up at work? Kate explains how our brains vary in terms of neural connectivity, hormone levels, and stress responses, and this can really translate to different working styles in a team. Figuring out what kind of brains you have on your team, and how to leverage them can give leaders the edge on getting teams to work together better, in brain-friendly ways. Kate also shares more about managing our emotions to get into ‘thrive” mode, leading the brain in times of crisis, and risk-taking behavior in women vs men.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Kate Lanz on LinkedIn

Mindbridge.co.uk

All the Brains in the Business: The Engendered Brain in the 21st Century Organisation, by Kate Lanz and Paul Brown

 

Jul 7, 2020

Many of us fear debate and conflict within our teams but when it comes to being innovative, it is absolutely critical. The thing is, we don’t always have the right or best idea right out the gate, so questioning and debating help strengthen ideas. Yet, it needs to be constructive conflict to be effective. How can we encourage that in our teams?

 

In the third of a four-part interview series where amazing business leaders interview me about innovation, Kris Boesch, the CEO and Founder of Choose People, a company that supports organizations in solving challenging people problems, dons the interviewer’s hat. Together we dig into what we as leaders can do to promote constructive conflict on our teams.

 

Constructive conflict needs to be respectful, and we need to debate ideas, not people. I share some of my strategies to help promote this in our teams, including presenting ourselves in a way that allows that space for constructive conflict. It is also important that we have the element of psychological safety, through vulnerability and trust, on our teams. Debate and constructive conflict can be done in a respectful way by being kind, candid and constructive, and coming from a place of care, concern, and curiosity, and not a place of judgment or assumption. By leveraging the friction that naturally exists between our different Everyday Innovator styles, we can turn it into something positive and drive better innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Kris Boesch, Choose People

Everyday Innovator Syles, IQE

World War Z

Kettering Foundation

Hello Bench Project

 

Jun 30, 2020

When we think of driving innovation, we often go straight to changing processes to push innovation, but in reality, what we need to be changing is people’s mindsets around how they view innovation. Chuck Swoboda is a strong believer that to get different behaviors, you have to start with different beliefs, and he joins me on this episode to explore how we can help people adopt an innovation mindset.

 

Chuck Swoboda is Innovator-in-Residence at Marquette University, President of Cape Point Advisors, and retired Chairman and CEO of Cree, Inc. As the co-inventor on more than 25 patents covering LEDs and lighting technology, with over 30 years of experience, Chuck is well-versed with being innovative and enabling innovation in others. His latest book The Innovator’s Spirit: Discover the Mindset to Pursue the Impossible dives into how we can tap into our innovative selves.

 

Innovation is much more about mindset than anything else. Chuck and I discuss what our roles are in being innovators in a time of crisis, and how we can change the mindset of being uncomfortable and uneasy with upheaval to that of seeing the opportunities. Chuck also shares more about the role of fear in limiting innovation, why it is easier to embrace risk in trying new ideas during crisis times, and how we can get our teams to embrace constructive conflict. How can we avoid getting bogged down in today’s problems, but instead look to the future and solve tomorrow’s problems and see the opportunities there? Chuck has a few key tips on this and how we can get over the hurdles that limit our innovative spirit.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour

Everyday Innovators Tribe

Chuck Swoboda

The Innovators Spirit: Discover the Mindset to Pursue the Impossible,
by Chuck Swoboda

Innovators on Tap Podcast

For Industry Leaders, Social Distancing Is An Opportunity To Seize Not A Problem To Solve,” by Chuck Swoboda for Forbes

 

Jun 23, 2020

When we think about innovation, we’re often thinking about coming up with the best solutions and creative ways to problem-solve. However, spending some time thinking about the questions we’re asking and the problem we’re trying to solve can help create better solutions. So why do we spend too much time on the solutions and not enough on the questions, and how can we start questioning our questions?

In the second of a four-part interview series where amazing business leaders interview me about innovation, Kris Boesch, the CEO and Founder of Choose People, a company that supports organizations in solving challenging people problems, dons the interviewer’s hat. Together we dig into how we can change our perspectives and start asking deeper questions.

Too often, we get stuck trying to solve superficial problems and addressing the symptoms of the issue instead of getting to the root of the problem. Getting better solutions starts with brainstorming around the questions we're asking. Try asking:

1. Why do I have this challenge?

2. What else does this challenge impact?

3. Why do I need to solve this challenge, to begin with?

 

Kris also shares some insights on dealing with toxic work cultures, the importance of being “kind, candid and constructive,” and the role of constructive conflict in innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Everyday Innovators Tribe

Kris Boesch, Choose People

John Lee Dumas

Jun 16, 2020

When it comes to change and getting people to change, as leaders we recognize that it can often feel really hard to implement, and pushing for change can lead to failed efforts. So what are we doing wrong that keeps up from making change work? Greg Shea and Cassie Solomon join me to dig into how we can lead successful change in our organizations and teams.

 

Gregory P. Shea is adjunct professor of management at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, and Cassie Solomon is the President and Founder of The New Group Consulting, Inc where she coaches leaders and consults to organizations on the design and implementation of strategic change. Greg and Cassie are co-authors of Leading Successful Change: 8 Keys to Making Change Work, where they share their tested method for leading successful change, developed over a combined 50 years of helping organizations do just that.

 

Changing the environment is often touted as a way to drive innovation and collaboration. The thing is, making superficial changes to the environment (e.g. with a ping pong table) doesn't help change the system needed to allow for innovation and collaboration. Greg and Cassie explain some of the tenets of making change successful and what has made their approach so successful. They also share more about change fatigue, how it creates resistance and makes people discouraged in wanting to change, and why the holistic approach to leading change helps set a company or team up for adapting and innovating.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour

Email Laura to Claim Your Bonus

Gregory Shea

Cassie Solomon, The New Group Organizational Consulting

Leading Successful Change: 8 Keys to Making Change Work, by Gregory Shea and Cassie Solomon

 

Jun 9, 2020

Have you ever had an idea and automatically shut it immediately down thinking, “No, that won’t work at all,” and then found that you couldn’t come up with any groundbreaking solutions? That’s because it’s next to impossible to innovate and analyze at the same time. So, why is it so difficult to innovate and analyze at the same time, to the point that you can’t do it at all, and it shuts down all innovation?

 

In this episode, where Kris Boesch, the CEO and Founder of Choose People dons the interviewer’s hat, we dig into the neuroscience and environmental factors that make it almost impossible to innovate and analyze at the same time, as well as how to overcome this problem.

 

We often shut down our own wild ideas, and as leaders, we shut others down as well. This stunts innovation, and prevents great ideas from emerging, so how do we disrupt that? Recognize what’s happening, and start thinking about innovation and analysis as two different steps, one before the other. We also explore what leaders can do to really support that innovation of thinking, how to keep innovation pathways open as leaders by avoiding the common pitfalls and mistakes, as well as how perfectionism and innovation are interrelated.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Everyday Innovators Tribe

Kris Boesch, Choose People

Burst of Innovation Three Ways Virtual Meetings Can Be More Innovative Than Live

 

Jun 2, 2020

We’re often asking our teams to come up with better solutions and innovative ideas by “thinking outside the box,” but what if we really need to be thinking about moving to a different box entirely? Steven Shapiro is an expert in pushing people to consider alternative perspectives, changing the questions, and challenging the assumptions.

 

Word-renowned innovation keynote speaker and author Stephen Shapiro has presented his provocative strategies on innovation to audiences in 50 countries for over 20 years. During his 15-year tenure with the consulting firm Accenture, he led a 20,000-person innovation practice. He is the author of six books, including his latest Invisible Solutions: 25 Lenses that Reframe and Help Solve Difficult Business Problems, where he shares his systematic approach to deal with any problem by asking better questions.

 

So how do we ask better questions? Steven shares more about why it’s important to take what we think is the opportunity or problem and look at it through different perspectives, and why questions have such a powerful impact on innovation. We also discuss how to identify solutions masquerading as questions, addressing explicit vs. implicit questions, and how to avoid assumptions. Find out more about the challenges with brainstorming, and how to work within the constraints we have.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Steven Shapiro

Accenture

Invisible Solutions: 25 Lenses that Reframe and Help Solve Difficult Business Problems, by Steven Shapiro

 

May 26, 2020

It's a common myth that systems and processes hinder innovation — but if done right, it actually removes the mundane and gives you the space to innovate. In addition, having the right systems and processes in place can help you get your business working for you, instead of the other way around. Josh Fonger joins me to show us how.

 

Josh Fonger is a consultant, coach, and speaker who is recognized as the leading authority in Business Performance Architecture, i.e. how to set up systems and structures in your business to work for you. After reading Sam Carpenter’s book Work The System: The Simple Mechanics of Making More and Working Less, Josh approached Sam to form a partnership focused on helping businesses properly organize and systematize their operations so they can achieve exponential growth. Today, Josh is one of the most in-demand Small Business Consultants in North America and has helped small startup businesses to $500 million enterprises from over 50 countries get unstuck using systematic solutions.

 

We dive into what inspired Josh to connect with Sam and start helping others “work the system,” as well as why we often don’t realize our systems aren’t working for us until it’s too late. Josh shares some of the top warning signs that our systems need an overhaul, as well as his insights into why people allow themselves to become the bottleneck. We also discuss how people can get into the system mindset, effective triggers for change, and how to balance systems with innovation, as well as why it’s as much about building the right systems as it is having the right people carry out the systems to get to success.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Josh Fonger, Work The System

Sam Carpenter

Work The System: The Simple Mechanics of Making More and Working Less,
by Sam Carpenter

Derek Sivers The First Follower

The Infinite Game, by Simon Sinek

Wooden on Leadership: How to Create a Winning Organization, by John Wooden

 

May 19, 2020

How can we as leaders build a robust team that thinks through ideas and solutions from all different perspectives? To do that, we really need to tap diversity of thinking on the team at the cognitive level, and that’s where vulnerability and openness about failure can come in.

 

In the second installation of this two-part interview series, Maureen Berkner Boyt, founder of the Moxie Exchange, and creator of the Everyday Inclusion App, interviews me about innovation and how it can help us build high-performing teams. We dive into what leaders do right and wrong in building a high-performing team, and how to sustain these efforts.

 

Innovation is not a straight line to success — I share insights about why building an innovative team is about thinking about the J curve all the time and anticipating what the response is going to look like for different people. I also share my favorite tools for unlocking innovation in your team — asking questions to improve, create, transform, disrupt, worsen. We also dig into some ways that leaders accidentally shut down innovation, and why rewarding behavior instead of focusing on success and failure is the key to unlocking the innovation on your team.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Bulk Orders — Call or Email

Inside LaunchStreet Podcast Episode 1897: “Tapping the power of innovation to build a high-performing team
Maureen Mo Berkner Boyt

Moxie Exchange
Micro-Learning Courses
Everyday Inclusion App
Rock Your Moxie: Power Moves for Women Leading the Way, by Maureen Berkner Boyt
Disrupt HR Talk: Hack Your Biased Brain

IQE Assessment

Anthony Lambatos, Footers Catering

Quad/Graphics

 

May 12, 2020

The modern workplace and 8-hour workdays seem to be dedicated to being busy and have forced us to give up our most valuable resources — time and energy. Yet, when more of our tasks demand creativity, critical thinking, and innovation, how can we reclaim our time and energy to improve our outputs?

 

Steve Glaveski is the CEO of Collective Campus, an innovation accelerator based in Melbourne and Singapore, that works with large organizations around the globe. As an entrepreneur, author, and podcast host, his mission is to unlock the latent potential of people so that they can create more impact for humanity and lead more fulfilling lives. His newly released book, Time Rich: Do Your Best Work, Live Your Best Life, aims to be a guide to achieving twice as much in half the time, and living your best life.

 

In this interview, we dig into what’s wrong with the way the modern workplace is set up, and how it impacts us in various ways — from a long feedback loop to poor employee morale, and feeling a lack of control. Steve also explains why being busy is a false measure of success, and why we need to focus on learning how to manage our energy, efficiency, and attention. He shares his advice about how to prioritize tasks, how to overcome the confusion between time worked and output created, and why reclaiming your time can create space for more innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Steve Glaveski

Time Rich: Do Your Best Work, Live Your Best Life, by Steve Glaveski

Collective Campus

The Case for the 6-Hour Workday,” by Steve Glaveski for Harvard Business Review (HBR)

The One Thing, by Gary Keller

Alexis Ohanian

BlockSite

InboxPause

 

May 5, 2020

Our teams are made up of diverse individuals with unique styles of innovating, but we often fail to leverage their strengths — a critical step in building a high-performing team that is ready to tackle challenges and produce better results. But why is tapping into the power of innovation so important, and how can we do it?

 

In this two-part interview series, Maureen Berkner Boyt, founder of the Moxie Exchange, and author of Rock Your Moxie: Power Moves for Women Leading the Way, interviews me about innovation. We discuss my “Steve story” — how I realized that everyone has an innovator within them, and why it’s so important for people to realize not only that they innovate, but also how they do it in a way that’s unique to them.

 

We dive into the difference between ‘creative’ and ‘innovative’ and explore why, while genius is rare, innovation is extremely common. Realizing that you’re innovative encourages innovation, and when everyone on the team recognizes the power that everyone else has, they begin to leverage each other in new and powerful ways. We also discuss why respect, trust, and understanding are the foundation for driving innovation, and how vulnerability ties into that.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Bulk Orders — Call or Email
Maureen Mo Berkner Boyt

Moxie Exchange
Micro Learning Courses
Everyday Inclusion App
Rock Your Moxie: Power Moves for Women Leading the Way, by Maureen Berkner Boyt
Disrupt HR Talk: Hack Your Bias Brain

IQE Assessment
Chef Boyardee
Inside LaunchStreet Podcast Episode: Everyday Innovator Spotlight How to Drive Company-Wide Innovation

Apr 28, 2020

Everyday innovators are the ones driving the innovation we are seeing across a variety of industries, companies, and governments that are making the pivots and changes needed to address the current pandemic and adapt to the changing times. Alex Goryachev, Cisco’s Senior Director of Innovation Strategy and Programs and author of Fearless Innovation: Going Beyond the Buzzword to Continuously Drive Growth, Improve the Bottom Line, and Enact Change, is one of these innovators I’ve featured in my book.

 

There are two parts to this extra-value episode. In the first part, Alex shares a story about how he realized he was looking for innovation in the wrong place — outside the organization. He shares more about how he reacted when this was pointed out to him, and the impact on Cisco of making the change and shifting to focus on innovation from within, both on the bottom line and employee engagement.

 

In the second part of this episode, we dive into his book, Fearless Innovation, where he tackles themes such as why innovation waits for no-one, why having teams and silos can have a negative impact on innovation, and how being pragmatic can unlock innovation. Communicating the value of innovation in a way that gets people on board with taking action is critical to driving innovation and we get into a really open conversation about quantifying the impact of “inaction” when you don’t change.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

IQE Assessment

Dr. Rex Jung

Alex Goryachev

Fearless Innovation: Going Beyond the Buzzword to Continuously Drive Growth, Improve the Bottom Line, and Enact Change, by Alex Goryachev

Cisco

 

Apr 21, 2020

When things are changing so rapidly (particularly right now), our usual approach of working from the present to the future is not going to work. To survive and thrive, we need to start from the future and work backward, yet this is something most of us don’t even consider, or if we do, struggle with. Mark Johnson explains the concept of “Future Back” and how that can help us in these rapidly-changing times.

 

Mark Johnson is the co-founder and Senior Partner of Innosight, a growth strategy consulting company. He has been a strategic advisor to both Global 1000 and start-up companies in a wide range of industries. He is the co-author of Lead from the Future: How to Turn Visionary Thinking into Breakthrough Growth (April 2020), which explores the concept of “Future-Back” thinking and provides a hands-on guide to long-term planning, strategy development, and execution within established organizations.

 

How is the future like an impressionist painting, not a photograph? Mark dives into the art of the possible, and how thinking about future scenarios calls for creative right-brain thinking. To survive, we need to start thinking about long-term plans but we’re constantly just in reactive mode trying to keep our balance. Mark shares how we can balance these two states, and his strategies to inspire and promote thinking clearly, creatively, and expansively. He also tackles the present-forward fallacy, why looking at data keeps us trapped in the past, and how to push past our cognitive biases to get to truly innovative future-back thinking.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

IQE Assessment

IQE Pro Innovation Toolkit

Email Mark Johnson

Innosight

Lead From The Future: How to Turn Visionary Thinking into Breakthrough Growth,
by Mark W. Johnson and Josh Suskewicz

Apple

BMW

Johnson & Johnson

Janssen

Daniel Kahneman

Longer is Better.” by Eidelman, S., Pattershall, J., & Crandall, C. S. for Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 2010

 

Apr 14, 2020

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is transforming our lives in unprecedented ways but the opportunity to innovate is also tremendous. At this stage, when everyone is in a state of hunkering down and trying to be productive in our new virtual workplaces, leadership is a key element that can help push us from survival mode to innovation mode, which is now what it takes to survive.

 

Maureen “Mo” Berkner Boyt, founder of the Moxie Exchange, a company dedicated to unleashing human potential at work, picks up our interview about my upcoming book Innovation is Everybody’s Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge. We discuss how we as leaders can create a more inclusive space to allow room for all the different innovation styles to shine as well as our favorite exercises for getting past the brick wall that keeps us in known and familiar thought patterns.

 

Staying relevant is all about thinking differently about the assets you have in front of you. I share why being realistic instead of overly optimistic in a time like this is better for team morale, and the importance of considering the mental energy of your team — it's limited and finite, and we need to take that into consideration as we try to manage all these different moving parts. Ultimately, approaching our current climate by asking questions and with curiosity instead of fear can make all the difference.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Maureen Mo Berkner Boyt

Inside LaunchStreet Podcast Episode 1893: “Innovation is Survival

Six Thinking Hats,” by Edward de Bono

A Message to Marriott International associates from President and CEO Arne Sorenson

Burst of Innovation Disruption and Distraction

Club Quarantine — @dnice on Instagram

 

Apr 7, 2020

Now more than ever, we need to tap into our innovative sides to find a path to move forward, particularly because the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has caused the world to shift in an unprecedented way. Innovation is no longer something that is ‘nice to have’ or something that we can put off to a future time; to survive, we must innovate by turning obstacles into opportunities and seeing the potential in our current situation. That’s why we need everyone to innovate, and that’s why innovation is everybody’s business and the title of my new book which we are diving into this episode.

 

Maureen “Mo” Berkner Boyt is the founder of the Moxie Exchange, a company dedicated to unleashing human potential at work. Mo dons the interviewer hat to dig deep into my book Innovation is Everybody’s Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge. We talk about innovation from an everybody/everyday perspective and I share the context for why innovation is so important, particularly at a time when it feels like we’re literally trying to survive.

 

Innovation is just as much about how you work, as it is about your products and services — it’s not enough to just think about how to create novel products and services if you are not keeping up with changes in the workplace. I share some of my insights about the four winds of change that are driving us now: accelerated change, micro-disruptions, a crowded playing field, and AI & technology and what we can do to get out of the survival mindset and into innovation. It’s really about taking what we’re already doing, and tweaking, adjusting, and doing things differently to adapt to our new circumstances.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Maureen Mo Berkner Boyt

Moxie Exchange

Micro Learning Courses

Everyday Inclusion App

Walmart reports increase in sales of tops, not pants, during the coronavirus lockdown,” New York Post

Inside LaunchStreet Podcast Episode 1872: The Primal Mind (Part 1 of 2)

Inside LaunchStreet Podcast Episode 1872: The Primal Mind (Part 2 of 2)

 

Mar 31, 2020

Leadership right now is in a really tricky place because things are not only uncertain, but they’re also out of our control. With the evolving novel coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, we as leaders need to adapt to the times and guide our teams through this situation. The time for shock and panic is over, and it is now time for us to find ways to move forward. To do this, we need to lead in a way that shows strength and courage, but also vulnerability and authenticity.

 

Here are five of my strategies that can help you navigate these uncertain times and be the leader your team needs.

  1. Realism over optimism — Approaching your team with an overly optimistic perspective that doesn’t include any reality minimizes the trust that people have in you. Instead, realism and transparency can provide people with the confidence they need to move forward.

  2. Action over answers — People know that you don’t have all the answers but they want to know you’re taking action.

  3. Investment over workload — At a time when it is tempting to put our heads down and focus on work and being productive, we need to show our teams that we are also investing in them and care about their growth and development.

  4. Innovation over restriction — Innovation has always been about navigating through uncertainty and finding ways to do things differently, and these are unique circumstances that you can lean into.

  5. Empathy over authority — Everyone is dealing with their own frustrations and worries, and as leaders, we need to acknowledge that and provide our teams with the space to express that, by being empathetic to their concerns.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Six-Part Online Innovation Class: The Six Keys To Being A High-Performing Innovation Leader

Burst of Innovation How To Lead During Uncertain Times

Burst of Innovation Seven Stages of Change

Burst of Innovation Disruption and Distraction

Kübler-Ross Model

 

Mar 24, 2020

Almost every organization has legacy thinkers and we have to deal with them to get things done. They’re often the people in senior leadership and have years of experience under their belts but they can be frustrating to work with because of their resistance to innovation and new ideas. They’ve got the been-there-done-that mentality to the point of holding the rest of us back, or they tend to have an ‘I know better and I’ve seen more than you’ attitude that shuts down ideas. There are also legacy thinkers who love to relive their glory days and successes of years past, which keeps them from opening up to new ideas today.

 

The thing with legacy thinkers is that we need them — they have experience, they sit in leadership roles — for whatever reason, we need to find ways to get them on board with change and onboard with the innovation that we’re trying to put forward. So how can we do this?

 

I have four strategies that can break down these barriers legacy thinkers have against change and innovation, and to get them behind these ideas to move the organization forward.

1. Have empathy

2. Honor past work

3. Connect the dots

4. Guided questions

These simple yet effective strategies are the key to changing the mindset of legacy thinkers and tapping into their expertise and experience to innovate.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

IQE Assessment

Burst of Innovation How to Get Legacy Thinkers On Board With Change

Mar 17, 2020

How much do you trust your own ability to think creatively and figure things out, without depending on the advice or opinions of an expert? Carol Sanford believes that for most of us, it’s not enough.

Carol Sanford describes herself as a lifelong learner and an educator who helps people develop themselves into more conscious, creative, innovative, and intentional human beings. Author of multiple books, and host of multiple podcasts including Business Second Opinion, Carol has over four decades of experience in helping companies challenge accepted best practices. Her recently released book The Regenerative Life — Transform Any Organization, Our Society and Your Destiny explores the nine regenerative roles that people adopt in different situations.

 

What is wrong with our society's current idea of who can change the world, and why don’t we have the consciousness, capacity, and courage to check in with ourselves? Carol explains how the “expert model” has led to us undervaluing ourselves and our ability to think, create, and use our own minds to figure things out. She also shares the dangers of putting people into boxes and labeling them, as well as the importance of reflection in growing and innovating. She has some fascinating insight about discovering your essence, the nine regenerative roles, and how to tap into them in different situations.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision-makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Carol Sanford

Carol Sanford Institute

SEED Communities

Second Opinion on Business Practice Podcast

Email Carol Sanford

The Regenerative Life: Transform Any Organization, Our Society, and Your Destiny, by Carol Sanford

John Watson, Founder of Behavioral Psychology

Enneagram

Here & Now, NPR

Mar 10, 2020

Everybody wants innovation and change, but most people don’t break from the path that they’re on. Why is getting stuck in our own path such a challenge when it comes to innovating and how can we get out of it? Jeremy Gutsche joins me on this episode to share some of his insights about developing disruptive thinking, both individually and at the organizational level.

 

Jeremy Gutsche is the founder of TrendHunter, a global crowdsourcing platform that helps you spot and understand trends. He is also a New York Times bestselling author and has just released his latest book, Create the Future: Tactics for Disruptive Thinking. Jeremy’s forward-thinking mind and ability to connect the dots in insightful ways is unique and he helps shed new light on the challenge of innovation.

 

What do horse butts have to do with rocket ships? Jeremy reveals how dependent we are on our past decisions, why that translates into people getting caught in their own path instead of finding the other paths of opportunity, and how looking at the problem from a different perspective can help you break out of that rut. We also dive into managing innovation like a stock portfolio, why disruptive ideas move slowly until the knockout punch, and how we can change our environment to produce better, more innovative ideas.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Jeremy Gutsche

TrendHunter

Create The Future, by Jeremy Gutsche

Everyday Innovator Style Assessment

Making the Elephant Dance: The Tata Way to Innovate, Transform and Globalize,
by Sunil Mithas

Tony Hunter

 

Mar 3, 2020

Have you ever looked at a product or seen an ad and wondered how someone thought to come up with that idea? Whether it’s good or bad, these are the ideas that are innovative and groundbreaking and they stick with us. One of those such products is RightRice, and its founder, Keith Belling joins me on this interview to share more about how he took on a big and traditional industry in a new and innovative way.

 

Keith Belling is the Founder & CEO of RightRice, a product that reinvents the concept of rice, and which sold over one million bags in its first year. Keith is a proven entrepreneur and innovator, and RightRice is his second foray into disrupting the F&B industry — his first being Popchips, a wildly successful food product. He is a master of following a frustration he has, figuring out how to solve it in a unique and meaningful way, and turning the solution into a business.

 

Opportunities in the marketplace are abundant, but we need to know where to look and how to approach these opportunities. Keith explains how to approach a really established, traditional marketplace with alternative products, and why it’s so important to bring to market something that’s meaningful and differentiated. We also discuss what it takes to cast off the baggage of past failures in the industry when trying to innovate, and what the future holds for RightRice in terms of competition.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Keith Belling

Right Rice.com

Instagram

Popchips

Turner Duckworth

IDEO

Whole Foods

Feb 25, 2020

In this episode, we showcase Everyday Innovator Kyle Murray, Vice Dean and Professor of Marketing at the Alberta School of Business. He studies human judgment and decision-making, and tools like experimental psychology and behavioral economics to better understand the choices we make.

 

Kyle sheds light on why sometimes innovative ideas can be too far ahead of their time and people aren’t ready for them, as well as how these ideas get put out without the realization that they might be too outlandish for people to accept. We dive into the role of failures in the bigger process of gearing up for success, and the impact that failures can have on individuals within the company pushing for these innovative ideas vs. the company in the long term.

 

We really explore some case studies of innovation that failed and the lessons that can be learned from them, as well as the red flags to look out for in innovation. Sometimes, releasing a product that is not quite right is enough to sound a death knell for it, but we also need a balance between releasing a minimum viable product and settling for good enough. Ultimately, Kyle highlights why it is so important to cultivate a relationship with your customers, and how that allows room for failure and innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation is Everybodys Business: How to Ignite, Scale, and Sustain Innovation for Competitive Edge, by Tamara Ghandour (Pre-Order)

Email Laura: laura@gotolaunchstreet.com

Kyle Murray

Alberta School of Business

Inside Launchstreet Podcast Episode 1803: “Innovation Lessons from the epic Crystal Pepsi Failure with Kyle Murray

Feb 21, 2020

Change can be hard, and it’s not always because we don’t want to change or because we fear it. Our habits and patterns can become so ingrained in us that it’s hard to change. The thing is, when we learn how to embrace it and adopt the right mindset around it, it can be so powerful and move our businesses forward with momentum. Joe Jackman has some great insights to share on the topic.

Joe Jackman is the CEO of Jackman Reinvents, the world’s first and foremost reinvention company, and has recently authored The Reinventionist Mindset: Learning to Love Change, and the Human How of Doing It Brilliantly. As an advisor to consumer brands, retailers, B2B companies, and private equity partners for over 30 years, Joe has helped leaders sharpen their strategy and orchestrate insight-led reinventions of their businesses.

Momentum and motion are fundamental to transformation, a principle that applies even in business. Joe and I dive into the reinventionist mindset — what it is and why it is so important, as well as the five principles that form its foundation: Seek Insight Everywhere, Embrace Uncertainty, Create the Future Now, Obsess the Outcome, Make Momentum Together. Joe shares more about momentum, why strategy is about knowing where you’re going and how to get there, and how to avoid insularity in thinking. Remember — there’s nothing more powerful than a community of like-minded people that believe in the same thing and are moving in the same direction.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities…

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Joe Jackman

Joe Jackman on LinkedIn and Instagram

Jackman Reinvents

The Reinventionist Mindset: Learning to Love Change, and the Human How of Doing It Brilliantly, by Joe Jackman

 

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