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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
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Now displaying: November, 2018
Nov 27, 2018

Have you ever wondered what you need to build a real culture of innovation? I'm not talking about ping pong tables and trust falls. I’m talking at the base level or culture. The invisible glue that makes it happen. Well, thanks to our guest Yoram Solomon, it’s not so invisible to us anymore. In fact, it’s quite tangible. Yoram is the founder of the Innovation Culture Institute. He has published 8 books, 22 patents, more than 200 articles, and was one of the creators of Wi-Fi and USB 3.0. He was named one of the Top 40 Innovation Bloggers in 2015, 2016, and 2017, and was a columnist at Inc. Magazine and Innovation Excellence — and much more. We dig into the elements that make up real cultures of innovation at the not-so-invisible level.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:54] Tamara opens the show by asking listeners if you have ever wondered what makes a real culture of innovation? How do you build accountability, autonomy, and innovation? Go to LaunchStreet and take the IQE Assessment so that you know your unique way of innovating. It starts with you! You can add to the culture.

[2:37] You might be surprised that Yoram and Tamara both have coached in the Destination Imagination program.

[5:34] Yoram’s Ph.D. examined why people are more creative in start-up companies versus mature ones. Listen in as Yoram discuss how his research led him to a few truths. First, if you don’t have a culture of innovation, you will not be innovative. Second, This is not a money issue. Money doesn’t buy the innovation culture. He believes that on a team level, it's the ability to conduct constructive disagreements.

[9:20] Yoram believes that the culture starts in the education system. We educate for accountability.

[11:48] Tamara asks if extrinsic motivation actually kills creativity/innovation. Do incentive programs work? Yoram discusses the candle problem experiment.

[15:11] How do you get the team to unlock the intrinsic motivation? Listen in to learn the importance of shielding your team from negativity.

[19:51] Tamara reminds team leaders of the importance of giving your team room and the ability to be creative.

[20:31] Yoram compares two CEOs and two companies. The biggest difference between massive growth and bankruptcy was cheerleading. Find out how to be the head cheerleader!

[23:32] Teresa Amabile, of Harvard Business School defines autonomy as not letting your employees decide which mountain to climb. It’s letting them decide how to climb the mountain. Tamara reminds listeners that we all innovate differently. Take the IQE Assessment to find out your innovation power triggers. Yoram’s power triggers are inquisitive futuristic.

[25:48] Tamara shares that as a team, we can get up that mountain together.

[26:24] Yoram shares three steps to conduct a constructive disagreement. First, be vulnerable. Second, be willing to give direct feedback. Third, be receptive/listen to feedback. Tamara brought up the myth that we need to surround yourself with people that say yes, and… We also need the people that disagree with you and poke holes.

[29:34] How can we train in constructive disagreement? Yoram shares a powerful lesson from the TV series, The West Wing. Ainsley Hayes, a young Republican lawyer, questions why the democratic president would want her to work for him. The president wanted to surround himself with smart people who disagree with him.

[32:12] Why do you get your best ideas when you’re in the shower? How do you create an environment where accidents happen? Yoram shares four steps to create new ideas. One: Immerse yourself in things outside of your comfort zone. Two: Relax. Let ideas incubate. Three: Engage in intense activity. Your brain needs to go neutral from high intensity. Four: Relax in the shower. Let the ideas flow.

[38:48] Sarcasm uses the same area of the brain as creativity. When you have a well-bonded team, it can use sarcasm.

[40:25] Why is trust the underlying element on the team? Yoram has developed a formula to help others build trust.

[42:38] Connect with Yoram on the Innovation Institute's homepage.

[42:59] Yoram’s final piece of advice on how to build trust within an organization is that it starts with building trust.

[45:42] Tamara really liked the discussion about autonomy, accountability, and disagreement. She invites you to go to the blog and check out the videos and articles on building a culture of innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation Culture Institute

Culture Starts With You.: The 5 Pieces of the Innovation Culture Puzzle,
by Yoram Solomon

Nov 20, 2018

Many of us struggle with the roadblocks of bureaucracy and legacy thinkers squelching innovation. Whether we work in corporations, for ourselves or as our guest does, in the behemoth that is higher education, we have to figure out how to navigate the system in order to drive innovation forward. Today’s Inside LaunchStreet guest, Alexader Lowry, has some experience in this so I asked him, “Hey, how do you pivot in an industry that wants to stay the course?” Last year he left J.P. Morgan in New York City and relocated to Boston to join Gordon College and launch the College’s new one-year Masters in Financial Analysis program. He wanted to prove that the old MBA model could work differently. We talk about how to find the right customer willing to take the leap with you, why we need to push back on the institutions we work in and how to move forward with a vision.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:50] Tamara opens the show by inviting listeners to get the right tools for innovation so that you can perform magic at work. Visit LaunchStreet to obtain the magic. Visit Innovation on Demand training videos to view the digital toolbox.

[3:14] You might be surprised to know that Alexander caught the traveling bug from his dad. His friends have labeled his traveling as his stupidity tour. Alexander has seen Stonehedge and watched Punxsutawney Phil see his shadow. His favorite experience was running with the bulls in Pamplona.

[4:58] How did Alexander come to the conclusion that the traditional two-year MBA system needed to be overhauled?

[8:17] How did Alexander identify which areas needed an overhaul? Get introduced to the term “long-term greedy” and learn about perverse incentives.

[9:42] Alexander believes ethical decision making is just doing the right thing. Under intense pressure and time constraints, it’s easy to not do the right thing. He shares an experience from his Wharton Business Class. His professor came into class and drops down a huge manilla folder. He explains that these are his students that have gone to jail in the last forty years.

[11:36] Tamara asks Alexander how he teaches ethics so that you don’t add to the manilla folder? Alexander believes that the program at Gordon College partially self-selects at the door due to the Christian worldview at the college.

[12:29] What makes the MBA at Gordon College different? It’s a one-year Masters in Finance. It’s done in half the time and with less than a quarter of the cost. This allows you to make different decisions after you are complete the program.

[13:44] What types of pushbacks has Alexander faced from the traditional programs?

[14:50] Alexander has experienced two types of people seeking his program. First, those that come directly from undergrad. And, second, those that come four to seven years out of school.

[16:57] Listen in as Alexander talks about why he left his glitzy Wall Street job and entered the world of academia. Tamara and Alexander talk about how life and your career are intertwined. Tamara tries to avoid the concept of balance. It’s a teeter-totter depending on what’s going on that day.

[19:19] Alexander took the IQE Assessment and his archetype is risk taker and inquisitive. He innovates by leaping and figuring out how things work. He also digs into assumptions and challenges things. Alexander’s wife says that he likes to figure out exactly how the system works so that he can figure out how to get around it. Because of this, he questioned what opportunity could be available that could challenge the Wharton MBA program. Tamara reminds listeners that quite often we miss the real opportunity because we are busy looking for holes in the product.

[21:12] Alexander shares his experience of leaving banking and NYC. He talks about challenging his own assumptions.

[23:06] Connect with Alexander at Gordon College or email him at graduatefinance@gordon.edu.

[23:27] What does the future look like for Gordon College’s MBA graduates?

[24:42] Tamara started her career on Madison Avenue in New York. She was an account coordinator. The best conversations occurred at midnight. She was put on a great disruptive team that had amazing results.

[26:25] Alexander’s final piece of advice is to start with something you’re passionate about. And develop determination strong enough to endure the ups and downs.
[28:00] Tamara reminds us that any industry has room for innovation and disruption.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Gordon College MBA Progam

Nov 13, 2018

As a leader, you’ve probably been given the mandate to build a culture of innovation with your team. So you go back, have a great pep talk, tell your team to be more innovative and even give them a process. But very quickly you realize that efforts are fizzling out or even failing. That’s probably because you are making the one big mistake leaders make that is killing innovation — you expect your entire team made of diverse people to innovate in the same way. If you want to encourage innovation, you’ve got to empower your team to innovate in the way that works for them. On Inside LaunchStreet I dig into how to encourage innovation by empowering your team to tap into their natural talents and strengths, to find the room to innovate.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:38] In today’s episode, Tamara will be diving into the big mistake leaders make. She was recently on a plane and had a discussion with an auto executive. He mentioned that innovation inside the four walls of his company was struggling. Tamara introduced him to the Innovator Quotient Edge Assessment and explained that it will pinpoint how his employees innovate naturally.

[3:45] Why does the big mistake happen? Leaders are given the mandate to build an innovative team. So, leaders take the mandate to their team. Often, the efforts fizzle out or fail. Is the failure the fault of the team or is it you? She suggests its the leader’s fault. You expect everyone to innovate in the same way. Tamara believes we are failing to live up to our innovation goals because we aren’t tapping into the natural abilities of ourselves and those around us.

[6:54] Your team needs the knowledge of how they innovate, permission, and the ability to flex their innovation muscles. Today’s podcast will tackle the knowledge of how to innovate. You first need to invest in the processes and instruction. If you invest in the people first, the right processes and tools will come out of it.

[9:00] Listen in as Tamara discusses how to empower your people. How do you give them the knowledge? When people understand their innovator archetype — how they innovate best — they are powerful.

[10:23] Is there only one way to innovate? Tamara shares her personal experience about being an advertising account coordinator. She worked for an amazing team that gave her the responsibility of organizing the big creative strategy meeting. Find out what happened when the creative genius failed to show up for the meeting.

[15:04] The team learned some important lessons that day. They learned that everybody is innovative. And, they learned that everyone innovates differently.

[15:56] If you want to be a rockstar innovation leader, have your team take the IQE Assessment and give them access to Innovation on Demand training programs. This will help them flex their innovator’s muscles. Tamara has identified nine triggers or ways people innovate. They are: collaborative, tweaker, experiential, fluid, futuristic, imaginative, risk taker, instinctual, and inquisitive. The way your team innovates is unique. Tamara talks about Marc. He innovator archetype is fluid inquisitive. He innovates in the questions, not the answers. He likes to dig for things. He is really good at taking a mess and stickiness and finding the innovation in ambiguity. Marc’s innovation was hindered because he had too many guardrails. His team removed the guardrails and Marc’s innovation took off!

[18:11] Tamara shares that Kylie is an inquisitive collaborative. Her strength is that she challenges assumptions. Kylie had quit asking questions. When the team identified her strengths, they encouraged her to ask those questions!

[19:05] Shelly is a client from Wendy’s. Her team lacked trust. After taking the assessment, they began to understand each other. This helped to build trust and value each other’s strengths. The team was able to recognize that it’s OK to innovate differently.

[20:02] Tamara challenges listeners to empower their teams by allowing them to innovate in their own way. How can you think differently about how your team innovates?

[20:44] Tamara shares a quote from a corporate executive with Arrow Electronics. “With the IQE Assessment and Tamara’s presentation, I have learned more about myself in the first two hours than I have in most day-long presentations. Her experience has opened my eyes and allowed me to truly understand and leverage my innovator archetype. Using the knowledge I have gained, I am sure I will be able to grow and add value to my career.

[21:34] If you’re the type of leader that believes that investing in your people helps create a high-performance team, Tamara challenges you to go to

GotoLaunchStreet.com and click on training, then go to team training. It all starts with the knowledge of how they best innovate. How about we allow the team to innovate in a way that they do best?

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

IQE Assessment

Innovation on Demand

Nov 6, 2018

Doesn’t it feel like change is the word of the year?! We talk so much about the accelerated rate of change; how technology, competition, launching new products and services are constantly changing. But what about the customer, where do they fit in? And this is why I had Braden Kelley on Inside LaunchStreet. He is an innovation thought leader, the genius behind the Innovation Excellence website and he has a range of innovative tools. He talked to me about how the biggest challenge we face isn’t just technology, it’s the customer’s increased expectations around the rate of change. How the fast flow of information is causing this AND how trust is how you battle all this crazy change. We also dig into how being agile actually includes some level of fixedness. Let’s get to it.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:58] Tamara opens the show by inviting listeners to spend seven minutes and take the free Innovation Quotient Edge assessment. It will help to unlock your greatest competitive advantage.

[1:54] There’s so much talk today about the accelerated rate of change. Tech, competition, and speed to market are in a constant state of flux. Where does the customer fit into all of this? Find out why trust is the secret sauce to combat change.

[3:32] You might be surprised to know that Braden is only 5’8 and is pretty good at basketball. His superpower is to see what is going to happen on the court.

[5:04] Braden feels that the rate of change is accelerating rapidly. The age of companies has gone from sixty years to twenty years. Also, the rate of customer expectation is accelerating. The customer’s experience must be as good as another great customer service experience. Customer feedback and information can now reach people globally in minutes with technology.

[9:22] How do you make innovation accessible to everyone on your team? Braden shares some of his nine innovation roles.

[11:50] Tamara created the IQE assessment to help all players recognize that all people innovate. Braden often sees companies put the focus on launching things, instead of innovating.

[14:52] How do you as an organization increase your agility and speed of innovation? If you want to be agile, you must strike the balance of flexibility and fixedness. He shares that the first area to explore is finding time to innovate. Cisco offers internal internships. This provides exposure to different areas of the organization. This also provides an external perspective from outside of the group.

[18:54] Why does a long adoption curve kill innovation? How can you avoid this?

[22:54] Tamara questions if there’s something that gives people an anchor to help them understand where the innovation value is. When something is incremental, it’s easier to make the connection.

They discuss Apple and their genius bar. People needed to have help available to learn the new device.

[25:58] Braden runs the site, Innovation Excellence. It’s a knowledge hub where innovation thought leaders post articles. Braden launched the site with Rowan Gibson’s innovation manifesto. This gives everyone permission to innovate. It inspires them and helps them to be curious.

[27:44] Companies talk about a culture of permission to innovate but often, people don’t feel like they have true permission to innovate. Braden shares the analogy that you don’t throw a ball at someone without giving them a mitt. Most organizations throw lots of balls and don’t give employees a mitt. Processes for innovation must be in place from the very beginning. Braden created Charting Change: A Visual Toolkit for Making Change Stick, to help organizations deal with change.

[31:40] One of the tools organizations use the most is the Change Planning Toolkit. It is designed to be the central asset. Braden offers the experiment canvas as a free download to help people navigate their way through experiments.

[32:57] Braden’s book, Stoking Your Innovation Bonfire: A Roadmap to a Sustainable Culture of Ingenuity and Purpose, is about helping leaders identify and remove the obstacles that cripple innovation. Braden identifies some obstacles that get in the way. First: Risk management does not come without a cost. Second: Innovation often becomes hard because of barriers. Third: Organization psychology is often the biggest barrier to innovation. Fourth: Not having a vision, strategy, and goals.

[34:17] How do we get to the place that people feel like it’s not a part of the organization? Tamara talks about Otterbox and WhiteWave Foods. They both hit a tipping point where they started bringing people in to add more processes. This caused them to lose the innovation surge that got them to move forward.

[36:37] What innovation myth is hindering progress? Is it all about new product development?

[37:35] Connect with Braden and check out Innovation Excellence.com for lots of free resources.

[38:20] Braden’s final piece of advice is to not stand still. If you stand still, you’ll get run over from behind. Don’t be afraid to try new things and pick up some new tools.

[40:22] How do you distinguish between real innovation and leaping on the latest trend?

[42:02] Why does the innovation need to be widely adopted? Why are so many people getting patents for mousetraps?

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovation Excellence Homepage

Charting Change: A Visual Tool Kit for Making Change Stick, by Braden Kelley

Stoking Your Innovation Bonfire: A Roadmap to a Sustainable Culture of Ingenuity and Purpose, by Braden Kelley

 

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