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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
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Now displaying: April, 2018
Apr 24, 2018

The other day, I watched the Defiant Ones on HBO and it got me thinking. Why do some people seem to always be ahead of change while the rest of us are struggling to keep up? What thought process or system do they use that would help the rest of us? And with that thought in mind, I had Jurgen Appelo, author of How To Change The World and president of Agile Scales to talk about his Super Model of Change. We chat about how doing what we've always done, faster, isn't the answer. It's actually about how we need to decide to change faster. We also dig into how successful companies die because they are successful and how to create an idea virus (it's a good thing).

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:44] You might be surprised to learn that Jurgen’s first piece of artwork was published on his kindergarten teacher’s wedding invite.

[2:56] Jurgen calls himself a creative networker. Listen in to learn about creative networking. How do you turn knowledge into creativity?

[6:10] Why is teaching people “how to manage” outdated and irrelevant? Agility is applied to the entire businesses. Hierarchies are most successful when they are turned into networks of self-organizing people. Management is not going away, it’s simply turning into something different.

[8:10] Jurgen shares success of a small company in Paris that is ahead of the curve in management. They have self-organizing teams, people setting their own goals and using OKRs (setting targets for yourself). Time is set aside during business hours for employees to learn. Tamara believes that it can be to our advantage to be small, organized and agile.

[13:00] Legacy culture is difficult to leave behind. Companies change slowly. Individual behavior changes much quicker than companies. It is often easier to start from scratch with a startup company than wait for change within an existing company.

[14:38] Why is it so important to have an agile culture in business today? Survival nowadays means that we have to adapt faster to the changing environment. It is not just about doing things faster. It’s about deciding that what you’ve been doing isn't making sense anymore. You must do something different. Tamara reminds listeners that it’s about making the decision to change faster than what we have done in the past.

[16:33] The Innovator's Dilemma The Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail (Management of Innovation and Change) helps readers understand that successful companies die because they are successful. At times, they don’t try the new, scary, risky things, and this brings on death. The time to be thinking about a new direction is when you have a lot of profit. Tamara tells people to watch the Defiant Ones on HBO. It tells the story about Jimmy Lovine and Dr. Dre realizing that they are big fish in a shrinking pond.

[19:14] Jurgen developed a Change Management Supermodel 3,0 It’s about changing behavior in organizations, and convincing the organization to move in a different direction. First, you need to dance with the system (PDCA cycle). Realize that whatever we try, the influence will go both ways. Second, change individual people within the organization (ADKAR model for change). Third, Ideas jump in the network from person to person. It’s called the adoption curve, or the idea virus. Fourth, Change is often initiated by the environment.

[22:44] Tamara asks if a creative cafe would be a good change in the environment for a board meeting? Use the environment to your advantage. How about using the coffee machine as a gathering place to discuss change? Tamara shares a story about walking into the grey cubicles of IBM. A tiny shift in our environment can make a huge difference in the change model.

[26:25] Jurgen discusses writing thank you cards in the form of a kudos box. A CEO in Poland told Jurgen that the kudos box was the best idea he has introduced. Employees love writing and receiving compliments from their peers. This helps the team to decide who is doing what well.

[29:59] Does having an agile culture inherently make the culture more innovative? Where does happiness fit into agility and staying ahead of the curve?

[33:14] Tamara brings up the fact that happier people contribute more and are more creative.

[33:28] Jurgen shares a tip to managing happiness. He really sees value in Tip #2, mind maps. Draw your name in the middle of the paper and begin mind mapping, writing whatever words come to mind that describe you. Then ,the team starts asking questions about your map. This is a fun, onboarding exercise to get to know each other better and make connections.

[35:48] Connect with Jurgen at his homepage, his blog, Management 3.0 and Agility Scales.com.

[36:25] Jurgen leaves listener's with a valuable piece of advice: Be weird, but not too weird. You need to be similar enough for organizations to believe in what you’re doing and have credibility. At the same time, your ideas need to be outside of their comfort zone, but within their stretch zone.

[39:13] Tamara challenges LaunchStreeters to do the mindmaps exercise with your team. She challenges listener’s to take the IQE Assessment. This will help you to understand how the mindmaps show up in their personal lives as well as their work. It will help you see a more holistic view of who each team member is and ideas of how to tap into their strengths.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovators Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail (Management of Innovation and Change), by Clayton M. Christensen

Jurgen's Homepage

How To Change the World. Change Management 3.0, by Magdalena Wszelaki

Agility Scales

IQE Assessment


Apr 17, 2018

When do you think about marking off all the things on your to-do list? Things like making a doctor’s appointment, asking an online store where your order is, making reservations? If you are like me, it's at odd hours of the day when I then can't do anything about it. I hate it! Well so did Matt Tumbleson, founder of Teckst, a revolutionary technology in the customer service space. He stopped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk to me about taking risks and what it takes to be a successful disruptor trying to transform a legacy industry or organization. He dropped some wisdom bombs around how to innovate within constraints versus always fighting them and how caring about how you can help others feel and be innovative is more important than you being the lone innovator is the difference between feeling amazing and actually moving innovation forward. He ends with how partnerships equal buy-in.

 

Key Takeaways:

[3:00] You might be supposed to learn that Matt developed an obsession as a kid with airplanes. He grew up in Florida around all things NASA.

[5:07] Matt’s took the IQE Assessment and his innovator archetype is inquisitive imaginative. He excels in the startup world by tackling problems and constantly improving things. Matt talks about his vision for perfection and how he views ‘getting there.’

[7:26] What mindset can innovators learn from entrepreneurs like Matt? He believes that being able to take risks means that you potentially have a reward.

[9:22] Tamara and Matt discuss risks and question if it's necessary to take risks to the ‘max’ to create a change.

[10:39] What inspired Matt to start Teckst?

[15:35] Matt realized that people wanted to reach out but not by phone. He understood the need to create something that didn’t exist. He found himself thinking about many tasks he needed to do and started thinking about how to utilize texting.

[19:49] The inquisitive type comes out when Matt talks about innovating by asking questions. He also challenges assumptions and asks, what if? How would I do this when I connect the dots?

[20:08] What lessons has Matt learned while disrupting in a legacy environment? It’s not the people that don’t want to be innovative. It’s the legacy and the processes that are making it hard for them to move the needle. Matt believes it’s imperative to identify who the end user will be. We come together and connect the dots. The users will see their input manifest in the end result.

[23:24] Tamara reminds listeners that sometimes we have a box that we have to deal with. Matt wanted to be sure that with Teckst, he created something that was within the constraints of the users and the legacy systems. He partnered with his clients so that they are innovating too.

[25:44] Matt talks about his view of partnership and the overused 1+1=3 equation.

[29:17] Tamara reminds listeners that it’s so important to get buy-in. You can eliminate risks when there is no black curtain and everyone knows what’s happening.

[31:27] Tamara reminds listeners that risk can sometimes feel like raising your hand in a meeting and going against consensus. Matt teaches that you’re allowed to say no and issued criteria that everyone can all agree on. By allowing people to say no, that opens the door for improvements. We can move innovation forward faster.

[33:02] Tamara shares that in InsideLaunchstreet, people can come to her with a problem, but first they have to create three solutions. This allows innovative people to solve their own problems. Matt believes that you also need a forum to talk about what you did.

[38:15] Matt holds the title of CEO but relies heavily on his team of experienced innovators to help him innovate. Tamara points out that building a team builds trust and opens the door for innovation. What problems are companies experiencing when they reach out to Matt?

[40:36] Find our why Matt believes innovation is a key factor in today’s fast-paced marketplace. Tamara discusses the pitfalls of attempting to single out a certain group of consumers.

[44:48] Connect with Matt on LinkedIn, or text him at 917-971-3557. Or, use Teckst at 855-980-6848.

[45:45] Tamara digs into Matt’s innovative archetype. She asks Matt how being imaginative and inquisitive has helped him to achieve his final goal. Matt challenges listeners to brainstorm and think about what is the worst way to solve a problem. Start with a terrible idea, flip it, and you’ll have a great idea!

[48:25] Tamara challenges listeners to be the disruptor. Discover your innovator archetype by taking the IQE Assessment today. It starts with YOU.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

Mentioned in This Episode:

GrubHub Homepage

Teckst Homepage

Apr 10, 2018

I bet you know that there’s a big difference between collaboration and consensus — where even the best ideas get watered down into the worst. And that there’s a difference in when to gather input and when to take action. My co-pilot, Connie Warden, and I dig into all of that and more in this Q&A episode of Inside LaunchStreet. I also share the time I was in advertising when Steve, our creative genius, didn't show up and the rest of us lowly everyday people had to be the ones with the brilliant ideas. You'll be amazed at what happens when people are given the chance to add input and you'll be even more surprised at who has the best ideas. It's not who you think, that I promise. We also talk about what to do when it's time to stop gathering and start taking action. And all that relates to how to build a process and culture where collaborative leadership drives the right ideas forward.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:01] Connie Warden joins Inside LaunchStreet to address a question from Jonah Grainger. He asks, is there such a thing as too much collaboration? Tamara believes that often we confuse collaboration with consensus. You never get to a decision because you’re trying to get everyone's decisions.

[2:54] Find out why Tamara and Connie think consensus doesn’t work. Tamara defines collaboration as the right people at the table, talking about the right things at the right time.

[5:56] How do you know when the right people are at the table?

[8:20] The mistake people often make is bringing the whole net of people and trying to reach consensus. It’s important to note their contributions and explain that you heard and value their ideas. Then, get the right team to move forward with the decision-making process.

[10:56] Tamara points out that often, the front line isn’t getting thanked or asked to provide input. Tamara shares an experience about a manufacturing company in Japan. Listen in to find out how the janitor solved the problem while standing on the train platform. Connie chimes in that it takes open-mindedness to value everyone’s opinion.

[13:28] Tamara and Connie discuss why the front line is often unseen.

[16:07] Tamara shares a personal story about when she was working on Madison Avenue. She was assigned the job of putting together a meeting between the creative genius, Steve, and the client. Find out what happens when Steve doesn’t show up to craft the creative strategy of the year. Collaborative leadership occurred without Steve!

[20:56] Without Steve in the room, everyone had permission to say the things they had all been thinking about. Connie talks about how much we work on our self-image, rather than what is authentically within us.

[22:22] Connie shares how her birthday Ninja story helped her to discover that your image isn’t important. It’s who you really are that’s important. Tamara reminds listeners that Connie was focusing on the wrong thing.

[26:44] Connie points out that we hide behind something, whatever we fear. We fear that we may not appear like we know it all. Connie and Tamara talk about the book, Braving the Wilderness. It’s OK to say, I don’t know it all.

[28:10] Tamara wraps up the conversation by saying that collaboration is a little bit messy. When you feel like there's too much collaboration, you have actually moved away from consensus. Follow the four phases of successful collaboration — One: casting the wide net. Give people permission to be vulnerable. Two: Have the right people at the table at the right time. Three: feedback loop. Helping people to feel valued and heard. Four: action/communication.

[30:06] Tamara challenges listeners to take real collaboration a test drive!

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Snack Food Business

The One Thing

Braving the Wilderness

Connie's Homepage

IQE Assessment

 

Apr 3, 2018

Does it ever feel like the marketplace is moving quickly outside your windows? Yet, the process you’re using inside those windows is moving slower than a turtle on a hot day. I know, I’ve been there — I totally get it. A lot of long-shooters feel this way. Sometimes, I feel like there’s this major disconnect between the change that we have to manage and how we manage it. It’s hard to truly innovate with a disconnect like that. So, Jason Little — author of Lean Change Management and the video series, Agile Transformation — came by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about how we can shake up our thinking and our processes to be more agile and innovate. We chat about how the key to lasting change isn’t about the processes you use — it’s actually about the people first — then, the processes. We also dig into why a set plan does not actually increase certainty and results — In fact, it decreases them. It’s not the plan; it’s the process of planning that minimizes uncertainty.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:16] You might be surprised to learn that Jason knows a former guitar player of the popular American heavy metal band, Megadeth.

[3:20] Agile is a powerful tool in helping manage change; It helps you understand your market, your context, and focus less on the process and tools, and more on individuals and interactions.

[4:29] Why some companies have stayed so antiquated with their change processes: Uncertainty.

[5:19] Is the need for certainty keeping us from managing change well? Jason says our brains are not wired for uncertainty which makes it difficult to implement change.

[6:25] How do you make change happen when you don’t feel uncertain? Jason believes changes within a company happens the same way a social change is made; It takes a community rallying together.

[7:44] Everyone needs to see the same problem that you see for change to happen. It’s not about buy-in; it’s about people seeing the same problem that you see.

[9:16] Why we can’t manage transformations the same way we manage an infrastructure project: Change doesn’t follow those schedules.

[10:42] Companies need someone to “shake things up” when pushing for change, transformation, and innovation — not someone authoritative and well-organized.

[12:28] What we should take away from Agile, what works about it, and what challenges we should be mindful of when trying to implement this type of process.

[15:03] Jason’s powerful experiences of helping implement Agile with an organization, bringing about incredible change. It’s all about de-risking and fixing the initial problem, then adding and fixing the secondary aesthetics after.

[16:46] Jason believes that testing out changes as you go, brutal transparency, and having a dialogue with customers is key to the success of implementing new changes.

[17:46] Does having transparency in the process help improve work ethics? Jason thinks so. When you can’t hide your work you become more raw and work more efficiently.

[19:45] How positive friction drives progress. You need someone who can challenge some of the ideas — acting as an anchor or counterbalance — to provide good, positive conflict.

[21:13] Jason shares a story about his first Agile coaching job.

[23:51] Organizations and situations that Agile is not right for. Jason says it’s all about risk vs. reward.

[25:49] “Manage change like a rockstar”; Jason’s take on how being a project manager can be fun, cool, and different. We don’t have to follow the same old step-by-step process.

[27:55] Jason’s “zumba method” shows how change happens in an organization. Through starting a conference with “spontaneous” dancing, he can figure out who is ready to drive change and who is resisting.

[29:47] People who show up to elective meetings are on the extreme ends — those who are extremely motivated to implement change, and the resisters who believe it will never work.

[30:22] How Agile helps a team or organization create a culture of innovation long-term. For Jason, it depends on how well the organization supports the people who are doing it. You don’t have to transform your whole organization. Let the people doing the work have a say in deciding how to do it.

[31:44] About Jason’s book Lean Change Management and how it can help organizations can shift.

[32:19] Where to connect with Jason and learn more: LeanChange.org.

[32:27] One piece of advice from Jason’s book that long shooters can take action on right now: “The people who write the plan don’t fight the plan.” Let the people who have to live with the consequences create the plan — then help them execute it.

[33:39] Tamara has one question for listeners: Who in your organization can be the one that can help you ignite and drive innovation? Go find that person and make them your champion. And if you’re not sure how to connect with them, Tamara has got you covered. Go to Innovation on Demand to get the video on the secrets to getting buy-in to your ideas.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Lean Change Management: Innovative Practices For Managing Organizational Change, by Jason Little

Agile Transformation A Guide to Organizational Change

LeanChange.org

 

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