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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
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Now displaying: August, 2018
Aug 28, 2018

I’ve had a lot of conversations with you all about taking the leap into entrepreneurship — so I thought I’d bring on David Gee, the author of The Corporate Refugee Startup Guide and an entrepreneur himself. He wrote the book because of his experience of taking the big leap into that vast unknown. So whether you are looking to actually take that leap or just to be more entrepreneurial inside your organization, you’re going to get a lot out of this conversation — especially when we talk about the fallacy of work/life balance! David and I also talk about how we may be looking at risk in the wrong way, and why being rock bottom may actually be a good thing.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:30] You might be surprised to learn that David was born in England and he loves home brewing.

[2:54] David speaks about what made him leave his job and become an entrepreneur. [4:54] How David defined risk back then and how he defines it now. Oftentimes, we create our perception of risk based on what we think we’re losing and not necessarily what’s ahead of us.

[7:25] Did having urgency in starting his business ultimately help David?

[9:18] What are the traits of people that gravitate towards starting their own business? David says a common link is people being delusionally optimistic and another is the ability to isolate a problem and creatively come up with a solution.

[11:00] David explains some of the toughest things that entrepreneurs face (from the lack of consistency to “the fog.”)

[13:05] David’s advice to those trying to take the leap or transition into a more entrepreneurial mindset. Be sure to talk to people that would pay you for your product or service (and not just your always-supports such as friends and family).

[15:50] Findings that surprised David in writing his book: the fallacy of work/life balance, and the notion that when you’re in a job you specialize and are not able to nurture your ability to become a generalist.

[19:34] What do you do in the beginning when you cannot afford to hire others to fill in the gaps in your skills (i.e. marketers, designers, etc.)? How do you build yourself up for success? David suggests you seek out resources and encourages you to reach out to others to fill out your gaps.

[22:09] How David defines success: it’s individual and personal for every person. The people he sees being successful are the ones who have gone out to solve a problem — not those chasing the money.

[25:19] How David defines success for himself now: creating generations of innovators and helping people be innovative.

[26:10] Would David define failure? Or is it all a lesson?

[28:45] One of the challenges we all face is we tend to create these unrealistic milestones based off of previous successes.

[31:11] Lack of resources forces you to be innovative.

[31:45] Where to find David online, connect, and find his book.

[32:15] David’s one piece of advice for those looking to take the leap as an entrepreneur: Prepare yourself, prepare your family, and build a solid business model that is focused on solving a problem.

[32:19] When do you know that you’re prepared enough vs. being over-prepared? David says when you start getting those buying signals it is a good sign to go ahead.

[35:02] What’s your big takeaway from this episode? Mine was that we may be looking at risk the wrong way and that it’s based around our perception of what we have to lose. It really shifted my thinking! This week, my call-to-action is to go to the podcast and leave a review to tell others what you get out of listening to this podcast and what you love about it. More reviews equals more amazing guests which means more insights like these for you!

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreetgotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Peter Principle

SCORE 

Startup Grind

David R. Gee LinkedIn

The Corporate Refugee Startup Guide: How to Prepare Yourself, Prepare Your Family, Leave Your Job and Build the Ultimate Startup, by Dave Gee

 

Aug 21, 2018

This is the third part of the three-part series with Anthony Lambatos of Footer’s Catering and the IQE partner. In this conversation, we take a slightly different approach. Because Anthony is so well-respected in the events and hospitality world, he often gets asked to speak at conferences and consult other companies on how to achieve the growth that he has. Every time he does that, he speaks about the importance of innovation and power of the IQE assessment to help you make innovation tangible. 

I wanted to better understand why the events and hospitality world needs more innovation and how the IQE helps them deal with the challenges they’re facing. I wanted to dig into that because I think Anthony’s experience with teaching others about the IQE and helping them solve challenges through innovation is something that we can all apply to our worlds.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:26] What’s happening in the hospitality and events world that makes innovation so important? Anthony describes why hospitality is ripe for innovation.

[6:04] Tamara tells a quick story about a recent rental car experience, relating it to the idea that you need innovation in your business or it will eventually fail.

[8:05] Why Anthony believes companies come to him to talk about innovation, and what he sees as being the major appeal of the IQE.

[9:24] The IQE assessment makes innovation tangible for people. Anthony describes what the IQE and innovation can do for people in the catering industry (and how it shouldn’t just be limited to the food).

[12:40] Many entrepreneurs are really good at the product they’re making but tend to lack on the business side. Anthony stresses the importance of amazing, innovative service.

[13:59] Some of the best innovation happens when you have a conversation with an extremely dissatisfied customer.

[14:26] Anthony gives three pieces of advice that tend to resonate with the people at the hospitality and events conferences he speaks at (from misconceptions of innovation, how to utilize the IQE, how to put a task force together, to the ‘look four ways’ exercise and giving a picture of what innovation could look like in their company.)

[19:11] Anthony expands on the idea of how when there’s no right answer people are more willing to share their ideas.

[21:04] What Anthony says about the IQE that gets people excited to learn. Anthony shares an experience he had with a salesperson to illustrate this.

[23:30] Other exercises and ways Anthony has brought out the innovator in people: encouraging them to reflect and by participating in the ‘look four ways’ exercise.

[27:39] Why thinking about how your favorite brand approaches a problem can help people become more innovative.

[28:52] Tamara talks about a recent experience with a client they did an IQE package with to help them come together as a better team.

[30:25] Anthony’s last piece of advice to people trying to build a culture of innovation.

[31:25] If you want to have that edge that Anthony has, go get a team pack and go over those opportunities together as a team. When you, as a team, come together and understand how each of you innovates differently and how you can leverage each other ... the power of innovation has exponential growth to it. Go to gotolaunchstreet.com, get a team pack of assessments by reaching out to us directly or buying it online.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

IQE Assessment

Footers Catering

Aug 14, 2018

You’ve heard me say it before. Having an innovative idea is only half the battle. The other half is getting buy-in for your ideas. Many brilliant innovations come to a dead stop at the presentation phase. It got me thinking, “What are we doing so wrong?” So I asked Oren Klaff, author of Pitch Anything and Director of Capital Markets at investment bank Intersection Capital, onto Inside LaunchStreet. His book breaks down how he gets people to sign over multi-millions of dollars on his idea pitches. We have a fast-paced conversation where he breaks down the difference between our presentations and the lizard brain, why “winter is coming” is the start of every presentation (i.e. get ready for a change), how to show excitement without desperation so you can craft an irresistible presentation or pitch to anyone.

 

I know this borders on sales, but I’ll tell you right now, innovators — if you want to get traction on your innovative ideas, you’d better learn how to sell them in a way that makes people listen. Here goes.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:51] You might be surprised that Oren has written 255 institutional pitches for money. He has written every single one of them with pen and paper.

[4:06] What is magical about the pen and paper process? Learn why Oren begins his presentations talking about The Games of Thrones and focuses on “winter is coming.” If you aren’t prepared for the change, you are going to be left behind, you are going to get wiped out.

[6:20] Ninety percent of the human mind is dedicated to detecting change. The brain is trained to do three things: detect patterns, focus on anything in the environment that’s changing, and detect deception. Oren reveals the elements that are necessary for a successful pitch.

[9:30] Get introduced into the term, lizard brain. Oren’s book, Pitch Anything teaches how the mind is different than the brain. Listen in to find out how the brain processes information.

[14:12] Oren suggests that Tamara tattoo the words, cognitive load, on her arm. Why are these two words so important? The neocortex uses up more than 20 percent of your energy. MInimize the amount of work their neocortex has to do. It’s your challenge, not their problem.

[17:08] Oren and Tamara discuss ways to limit the cognitive load.

[21:57] Learn about different kinds of frames and how to break them. Frames are a way of looking at the situation. What do you do when your listener exerts power over you?

[23:52] Oren and Tamara discuss ways to break through the power frame when the decision maker, Bob, didn’t show up for the presentation. Oren teaches how to change the dynamic from being controlled to controlling the situation.

[30:30] It’s scary at first to break through that power frame. When someone has power over you, three things happen: First, their focus becomes extremely narrow. It’s hard for them to appreciate the scope of what you’re talking about. Second, they have risk-taking behaviors. Third, they only see you at a very surface area. You have to break the power frame.

[34:31] When does the power frame show up? In the beginning, you must shift the power, take the risk.

[39:24] Why is it necessary to eradicate neediness? Neediness triggers something very uncomfortable in human beings. In primitive times, if you needed something, you were something to be avoided. Anytime you exhibit needy behaviors, it makes someone pull away from you.

[42:19] What’s the difference between showing interest and neediness?

[44:17] Listen in as Oren teaches how to deliver the prize frame and avoid the asshole effect. Tamara reminds listeners that doing this keeps you from taking on the bad clients that suck the life out of you.

[51:33] Oren’s upcoming book, The User’s Guide to Power, looks more deeply at the dominance hierarchy. It discusses where we fit in the people around us. Why do you frame your idea as the plain vanilla?

[53:36] Oren’s advice to listeners is to have the ability to talk about an idea for two to three minutes. Don’t say anything about you or your company. Just talk about the idea.

[55:14] Tamara asks listeners to leave her a message on Inside LaunchStreet about how you are going to pitch your product.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Intersection Capitals Homepage

Pitch Anything: An Innovative Method for Presenting, Persuading, and Winning the Deal, by Oren Klaff

 

Aug 7, 2018

Head trash! It's what keeps most of us down in the status quo dumps. In fact, have you ever noticed that the louder your mind is, the worse the head trash? And it's always negative and that negativity squelches creativity. With that in mind, I asked Matthew Ferry, coach to thousands of top performers to achieve Enlightened Prosperity and author of 7 Steps to Happiness and Success, to be on Inside LaunchStreet to talk about how to have a quiet mind and an epic life. We dug into how being tuned-in to life gets you to a more expansive and creative state, how we often attach the idea of risk onto the fear of losing out on an imaginary benefit, and he shared how pride, illogical rules and not being of service get in the way of the creative mind.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:48] You might be surprised to learn that Matthew is a songwriter and producer. He is a trance music nerd.

[3:18] Find out what it means to Matthew to live an enlightened life. How does one know if you’re tuned into the enlightenment?

[6:35] Once you’re tuned into this state, how do you stay there? When you have head trash, your focus is narrow; things agitate you. When you are not in that head trash place, you see more, you're open to more, and the world seems more beautiful.

[8:01] Matthew believes you can live both a quiet life and a kick-ass, epic life. When you experience your infinite nature, you realize that nothing really matters. You get more space to clarify what really matters in your head.

[10:06] Tamara asks Matthew what tools or tactics can help you to minimize the mind chatter? You have to neutralize the mind’s reason for speaking, for talking, and for thinking. The mind talks because it’s part of our code. One has to be able to find the ways in which you’re being a traitor. Then, you have to release your motive for being a traitor.

[12:16] Matthew discusses the idea of success and failure and ‘am I giving it my all’?

[14:15] Find out why Matthew compares positivity to ice cream over mud pie.

[15:00] Matthew helps clients identify pride, grief, and where are you following illogical rules? He also helps identify where you’re being humble and pretending that it’s noble. Tamara reminds listeners that you bring creativity to the world by allowing yourself to think at this level.

[18:07] Matthew shares some examples of illogical rules: Be cordial, Do what other people do. Follow the rules. As entrepreneurs, it’s your job to question everything.

[20:51] Get introduced to the term, spiritual hooligans. What prevents us from breaking the rules?

[23:48] Matthew’s IQE archetype is fluid futuristic. He’s really good at challenging the status quo and navigating through the mud. He innovates in ambiguity and in solving tomorrow’s problems. Matthew believes that you have to decide if you’re creative. Accept that it’s OK if you aren’t.

[26:10] Why do we fail over and over again? Why do we keep resetting the goals?

Matthew believes that people want to have an experience — that’s what they actually want.

[30:52] Tamara and Matthew talk about the theory that you don’t quit when you want to quit. A deficit is the inspiration for all of our innovation. Watch Matthew teach about goal setting here.

[34:14] If you’re functioning in a state of deficit, do you settle for incremental thinking and ideas? Matthew suspects that you accomplish but you aren’t satisfied. You achieve, but you are unfulfilled. You must dance in between the finite and infinite. Tamara challenges Launchstreeters to examine which place on the teeter-totter you are playing.

[36:06] Connect with Matthew on his homepage and on his Facebook page, Spiritual Hooligans.

[36:51] Matthew challenges listeners to forget about the outcome of your goals and put your attention on the experience you think the outcome will create. Have that experience in the smallest ways, every single day.

[43:12] Tamara asks listeners to mindmap all the rules in your life and work. Find the illogical rules that are holding you back from your next big idea. Then, write a review on iTunes about the value that you get on Inside LaunchStreet.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Matthew's blog

Matthew's homepage

Spiritual Hooligans

IQE Assessment

 

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