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Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Inside Launch Street is the innovation podcast where we interview top innovators out there shaking things up so YOU can innovate and differentiate and get further, faster in this crazy cluttered world. When you are ready to take your game to the next level, join the thousands of others that are upping their innovation edge on gotoLaunchStreet.com, the top online education, resource and community platform for innovators looking to use innovation to get measurable results.
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Now displaying: February, 2018
Feb 27, 2018

In my travels, I meet a lot of entrepreneurs that claim to have an idea that is going to totally disrupt their category. Sadly, it's rarely the case — sorry, but it's true. But then I met Henry Schwartz, one of the Founders of MobCraft Beer. Their entire business model is disruptive. He popped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about how putting the customer in the driver seat has been the secret sauce to their success and how to transform experimentation from something you fear to a part of your business model.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:56] You may be surprised to learn that Henry once had dreadlocks and backpacked to 37 countries before he graduated college. Listen in as Henry talks about pairing his passion to skateboarding. He opened his first store at age 15.

[5:29] Henry lives by the tagline, we turn ideas into beer. People submit flavor ideas, an election is held, and then the flavor winner comes and helps to produce the winning beer. The entire process is crowdsourced. Each beer is crowdfunded.

[8:15] Listen in to find out what lessons Henry has learned along his journey.

[9:42] MobCraft’s unique distribution model has helped to contribute to their success. They have learned to market the product in many different ways. MobCraft is celebrating their 50th month of crowdsourced beers!

[11:48] Find out how the king of fruit, that tastes like heaven but smells like hell, became durian beer, a sweet mango, custard beer.

[13:46] How does Henry view experimentation, failure, and risk? MobCraft scales down their recipe until they ensure that it’s the perfect batch. Tamara advises LaunchStreeters to batch out your innovation and test small experimentations.

[16:53] Disruptive innovation requires that you pivot. It’s really easy to get comfortable. Agility, and thinking inside the box helps you to make decisions. Tamara likes to think of it as rearranging the box.

[18:37] Henry took the Innovation Quotient Edge Assessment and his innovator archetype is imaginative futuristic. The imaginative edge helps Henry to see innovation in blank spaces and to create new novel approaches. The Futuristic edge enables him to pivot, be adaptable and see into the future.

[21:17] MobCraft’s success in disrupting innovation is due to the fact that Henry is always thinking about the next thing. Tamara talks about the importance of the team. It helps you to balance and determine what sequence to follow. She cautions about following your competitor and the importance of owning your own space.

[23:26] Henry talks about swimming with the sharks in the Shark Tank! Find out what he took away from this experience.

[26:57] Tamara loves that MobCraft is an experience from start to finish. Henry shares a story about a phone call from a fan in Florida.

[29:12] How does having excited, wide-eyed customers visit the brewery help your team to stay motivated? The consumer is in the driver’s seat experiencing direct emotional connections.

[31:19] Henry looks for feedback for both personal preference and quality issues. He cautions to dig deeper and get accurate feedback for your product.

[32:53] Connect with Henry on Twitter, Instagram, and henry@mobcraftbeer.com. Vote on the next flavor of beer at MobCraft Beer.

[33:48] Henry tells Launchstreeters the way to disrupt innovation is to do the thing that makes you afraid.

[34:25] Tamara asks listeners how they can rise above the noise. You must be in a space that is defendable and ownable. Check out the Innovation on Demand Courses and Packages to help get you on the right track.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

MobCraft Beer Homepage

Henry's Shark Tank Episode

 

Feb 20, 2018

How do you get those that want to stay in the status quo see the light of innovation? Why do some people seem like they fear change? That’s the question, submitted by LaunchStreeter Kelly Foster, that we answer today. My co-pilot, Connie Warden and I dig into how to “validate and connect,” the difference between mindful and mindless and how to think differently about driving change. We also discover that Connie once banked a plane and Tamara thinks you are the reason innovation doesn’t gain momentum.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:16] Half of the battle of change is getting the people to go along with you. Connie believes that it’s the tension of knowing what we know and being both comfortable and uncomfortable with the unknown.

[4:51] How can one help the blind to see the innovation light? Tamara shares a personal experience from one of her keynotes. It’s most important to bring change to the table by bringing awareness. We need to point out that it isn’t that things have been “wrong.” We will always be evolving and transforming.

[7:42] Humans are either growing or decaying. Find out how Connie gets the organization to buy into the idea of change.

[8:50] Listen in to find out how asking your family if they like your new recipe can help you learn to remove your own personal feelings of rejection from the equation.

[11:14] Tamara and Connie talk about positioning change and new ideas. Tamara shares that a powerful way to steer leaders toward change is instead of going to them with just the new idea, listen to what they are saying and find a way to connect the dots. Connie believes that this helps the person understand that you see them and that you are looking for their experience and buy-in. Tamara talks about brain highways and the importance of wording things so that they are positive.

[17:30] Millenials expect change and see it as constant. Tamara thinks we can all learn from their enthusiasm and willingness to accept change.

[18:47] Connie was a flight attendant with Continental Airlines. She was in the cockpit of an Airbus and the pilot asked her if she wanted to bank the airplane. So, she did!

[21:08] One of the first things Connie learned as a flight attendant was that people were very predictable depending on what city they were arriving or departing from. Bringing awareness to the mind is so powerful. Listen in to find out what difference can be made when you learn the culture of your environment. Tamara shares the importance of speaking to people in a way that it connects to them. We need to speak their language. This helps to validate and connect what they have done in the past while bringing them forward.

[23:58] Connie relates a story from Jon Kabat-Zinn regarding the powerful connection when we speak the same language. Tamara challenges listeners to practice in our daily lives two things: First, speak the language of the other person. Second, practice getting comfortable with negative feedback.

[25:40] Tamara talks about personal responsibility. If you want to own it, it’s your responsibility to drive the change. Connie relates a story about her mom learning the iPad. She just kept “pecking” on the keyboard because that is what her neuro pathways related to.

[28:07] Think of creating change as creating new neuropathways. In order to release the tension, and overcome the fear of change, we must validate and connect.

[29:18] Tamara challenges listeners to check out all the videos and tips on the blog that will help you step into the light.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Jon Kabat-Zinn's 9 Mediation Tips to Cultivate Mindfulness

Launchstreet blog

Feb 13, 2018

Are you tired of people telling you to be more entrepreneurial or wondering what it takes to adapt in today’s changing marketplace? Me, too! That’s why I had Joni Fedders, the president of Aileron, a national nonprofit committed to helping individuals and small businesses succeed, stop by Inside LaunchStreet. We talk about the power of adding value to the world, the anabolic and catabolic energy it takes to be an entrepreneur and how leaping into the unknown has helped her succeed.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:38] Many people are surprised to learn that Joni found her voice at age 12 when she wrote a letter to the editor complaining about a business that left their lights on all night. Little did she know that the business was her Dad’s company!

[2:48] Aileron’s mission is to raise the quality of life in America by developing growing and sustainable companies.

[3:59] Is it possible for a lot of little businesses to have the same impact as large corporate businesses?

[5:02] Joni shares that for small businesses to compete, and be successful entrepreneurs, they need to be proactive and adaptive. You need to be consciously adaptive and aware of what’s happening. You must be good change agents.

[7:03] Do change agents make change happen or do they leverage change as it’s happening?

[8:35] Tamara reminds listeners that right now there is so much room to be the long-term change agent.

[8:56] Being an innovator isn’t just your work. It’s your life. Joni asks class participants one question to point out that there are a lot of emotions that accompany successful entrepreneurs. She asks, When you hear the name of your business, what emotions run through your body?

[10:47] Tamara asks Joni if you always have to feel energized and excited. Get introduced to anabolic and catabolic energy. Joni believes that it’s natural to feel both positive and negative emotions. What’s most important is becoming conscious to the emotions.

[14:00] Tamara and Joni discuss that it’s often hard to deal with the isolation of small business. Often, business owners take it all on their shoulders. Joni’s classes can help people deal with the pressure.

[16:20] Tamara reminds listeners about the importance of seeking other people’s perspective. Learn about the power of a peer advisory board. What does the advisory board look like?

[18:48] Failure and Success make up the two sides of the entrepreneur coin. Joni shares an example of failure with Iams Dog Food. Joni believes that biggest contributing factor to successful entrepreneurship is that you are able to create and articulate value.

[20:09] In today’s marketplace, is it enough to go to market with something better or stronger?

[24:02] What are some commonalities in businesses that succeed? Joni believes that successful businesses are conscious and adaptable. They focus on a win/win scenario — a win for the customer and a win for the business.

[28:03] Tamara mentions that most great leaders lean into learning and keep an open mind.

[28:35] Find out how Joni’s risk-taker imaginative archetype led her from dog food to starting her own tech company.

[31:17] Connect with Joni at Aileron.org.

[31:31] Joni shares that there were many times that she looked back and thought, Wow, I’ve made some big mistakes — but, I am sure glad I did it.

[32:45] Tamara shares that she recently encouraged a member of her family to leave corporate America in search of her own consulting firm. If her experiment fails, she will gain valuable learning to take back into the corporate world.

[34:57] Joni offers two pieces of advice. One — continue to become more of a conscious Aileron leader. Be aware of what you are thinking. Two —keep an open mind and continue to learn. Experimentation adds value.

[36:25] Tamara reminds listeners that it's not enough to be better. You have to add value and articulate value. The value must be innovative! Watch the video about how to avoid the ‘-er’ trap on Innovation on Demand to become a successful entrepreneur.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Aileron

Feb 6, 2018

Are you as fed up as I am with all the lip service to change management? We keep talking about it yet most change management efforts fail. That's why I hunted down a few leaders, like Paul Gibbons, author of The Science Of Successful Organizational Change, to help us better understand why they fail and how to do it right. Paul came by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about why most efforts fail, how availability bias is our biggest sabotager, the power of questioning literally everything, and what to do to drive lasting change.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:48] Paul’s nickname is Disco Paul, dating back to age 15 when he won a disco contest wearing polyester pants!

[3:57] Listen in to find out why management change is such a hot topic right now. Paul introduces us to the term “availability bias.”

[6:05] Availability bias is where we overweight data available to us. We see only how much effort we are putting in.

[7:05] Paul hypothesizes that we should be talking more about change. There are 100 electives at the Harvard Business School and only one class teaches about how to make changes. Schools shouldn’t be teaching that change is the exception; it’s more of the rule.

[10:27] The best piece of advice Paul can offer to LaunchStreeters is to involve people sufficiently and early enough in the change management process. People are more welcoming to change if they feel as if their voice has been heard.

[11:52] One major piece Paul would like you to take away from his book, The Science of Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture, is to question everything. Paul’s book is a debunking about the early change models. Listen in to find out why change in business is often compared to death. Paul talks about the Kubler Ross Model.

[16:39] Learn about the history of burning platforms in comparison to change management.

[20:25] When did Paul realize that the narratives and platforms surrounding change management were not the real deal?

[25:50] Tamara reminds listeners that we as humans are dynamic. Our organizations are also dynamic. We cannot pigeonhole change into a one-size-fits-all.

[29:24] Paul talks about the psychological aspect of taking risks. It’s important to understand how your team responds when they are under the pressure of taking risks.

[32:04] Is risk culture created by the hard wiring that we bring into the decision or is it the risk psychology that we adopt?

[34:20] Paul and Tamara talk about failure and the inauthenticity of failure. Paul references the failures of Amazon.

[37:12] Paul talks about starting his new company and the importance of creating a compelling ‘we’ vision. You must have something that touches people’s hearts and creates passion. This will get your project off the ground. Tamara reminds listeners that you must have people buy into the ‘why’ of the project.

[41:30] Tamara reminds Launchstreeters how important it is to bring others into your vision.

[41:59] Connect with Paul here and listen to Paul’s newly launched podcast, Think Bigger, Think Better.

[44:43] How can innovators help to shift change in their organizations?

[49:54] Tamara reminds listeners about asking inciting questions — the questions we’ve never asked — can stir and prompt new insights. To find out more about inciting questions, visit Innovation on Demand.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea
  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change
  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Kubler Ross Grief Model

Kotters 8-Step Change Model

The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization, by Paul M. Senge

Reboot Your Life: A 12-day Program for Ending Stress, Realizing Your Goals, and Being More Productive, by Paul Gibbons

The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture, by Paul Gibbons

Pauls homepage

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