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Inside LaunchStreet

This innovation podcast will resonate with those that recognize that being more innovative is their ticket to being indispensable and for leaders of all levels under pressure to build a culture of innovation. A blend of insightful interviews, audience questions, spotlights, and an occasional rant, your host Tamara Ghandour brings a fresh perspective to innovation. As the author of Innovation Is Everybody's Business and the creator of the Innovation Quotient Edge assessment, Tamara makes innovation accessible to all of us in this conversational style podcast.
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Now displaying: 2018
Jul 3, 2018

Part one of my conversation with Anthony Lambatos, President of Footers and IQE Partner. We do things a little differently for this episode. Anthony and I go deep into how to make innovation tangible. He shares how the rewards programs, voluntary committees, and the IQE assessment help him make innovation something that happens every day. We also talk about how setting expectations around the J-curve of innovation helps ensure the naysayers don't win and recognizing the power in the 80% rule — something you'll definitely want to consider after this interview.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:30] You may be surprised to learn that Anthony has a separate sports bucket list.

[5:09] How do you create a great place to work? Anthony and April’s original goal was to do just that! Part of their mission statement is to make it better every day. They utilize voluntary task forces to help make things better.

[9:36] How do you move the shift past, one more meeting, and get them excited to join a task force? The fact that it’s voluntary is huge. It’s something that they genuinely care about and challenges them to work on something new.

[11:55] How do you pick what’s worthy enough to be a new project?  It’s driven by the strategic plan and the eight company directors. Each director is in charge of an area from the strategic plan. Ideas also come from our team.

[14:38] Anthony employee’s efforts are rewarded by submitting requests for team members to earn Jimmy bucks. The playing field is level in that every employee can submit the request. Tamara talks about the importance of celebrating the behaviors, stepping up, and trying something new. It’s when you only focus on the outcomes that innovation fails.

[17:10] Get introduced to the 80 percent solution, and find out how it’s opened the door to a lot more progress. Anthony talks about failing three times to automate the pack list and about the lightbulb moment about letting go of perfection. We focus on making it better. Our acronym, MIBED, is our internal branding within our team.

[20:50] We tend to focus on the 20 percent because it’s glaring. Everybody can see that this part isn’t working. Productivity doesn’t go in a straight line. Anthony shares the “J” curve.

[24:02] Tamara often shares in her keynote addresses that it gets harder before it gets easier. Setting expectations at the front end is so important to get through that “J” curve. Anthony shares that it’s important to point out what the inconveniences will be and how the team will work through the problems.

[25:24] Anthony and Tamara discuss the importance of failure. Anthony believes that the task forces are a safe place for employees to throw out all ideas. Challenging people to be open with their ideas is essential. He likes the team exercise, Look for Ways.

He shares an example how a one-star review of Snowbird ski resort, was turned around and used as marketing tool.

[28:12] Footers, comes out of the gate differently. At the base of that, is the motto Make It Better Every Day. How has this view impacted your culture, innovation? Anthony shares that Thomas Edison didn’t invent the light bulb, Others had invented it before him. Edison invented the first commercially viable light bulb. Anthony believes that the key to innovation is making small incremental movements that will make it better.  Innovation is tangible and manageable. Tamara talks about rearranging the box, instead of getting out of the box.

[32:42] The secret sauce to a great culture is to genuinely care about the people that work for you, and in turn, the people want to do a great job. Anthony feels it’s also important to give the team opportunities to grow and improve.

[34:17] Tamara encourages listeners to pick one action point that Anthony talked about and implement it today.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea
  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change
  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Footers Catering

IQE Assessment

Jun 26, 2018

There are many factors that make or break the success of a new idea, especially an innovative one that bumps up against a traditional industry. There are two big factors I wanted to address with our guest today, Johan Lupton, creator of SoundGuard, soundproof paint. First, how to solve a big enough problem that you create a massive market for your product, and second how to actually leverage instead of fighting the traditional players in the industry. We dig into Jonah’s mistakes, successes, how we thought differently about where his product fits in the bigger picture and why staying focused on who you serve is key.

Key Takeaways:

[1:29] You may be surprised to learn that Jonah spent 8 years working in the investment industry. Also, he’s never been to California!

[3:24] Jonah left the investment industry and began trying to solve the problem of hearing his neighbor’s kids in the townhouse next door. He set out to create a noise blocker paint that looked nice as well. This began his journey of creating SoundGuard.

[7:44] Jonah built a partnership with the lab to help him build the paint. He knew that he needed expertise. Tamara reminds listeners to know your lane.

[10:27] Find out what lessons Jonah has learned along the production journey. Tamara points out that Jonah figured out how to identify the qualifiers that will take the unnecessary fear out of the conversation.

[15:32] Jonah has had great success in sending cold emails. He’s getting a great response because the subject line addressed a need. Tamara tells about a new idea of drone window washing. The biggest challenge the inventor is experiencing is inertia. Moving to something new is often a big hurdle. Jonah shares how he moves past the hurdles of new construction.

[19:22] What kind of proof do customers need? Is having faith in the product enough? Jonah shares his experience that he declined painting an elevator shaft because he didn’t have the proof that the paint would stop vibration sounds. Some projects, you just have to say no to. Johan pointed out that he has to stay in his lane and focus on the sweet spots of his product.

[23:32] Listen in as Jonah talks about how his dream and focus for SoundGuard has changed along the way.

[26:00] Tamara introduces listeners to innovation on demand, a course to help entrepreneurs create a kick-ass one-page business plan and a commodities no competition zone.

[28:26] What sustained Jonah during the two-year product launch? How did he keep the motivation and drive going? Tamara reminds listeners that you have to have faith in yourself and believe in your product during the uncertain times.

[34:40] Connect with Jonah at Soundguard.io or Google soundproof paint.

[34:59] Jonah gives advice on how to launch a revolutionary and defendable product. He advises that you don’t always need a co-founder. Other specialists can help you fill this space.

[36:41] Tamara challenges listeners that live in shared spaces to tell your manager/owner about Soundguard. Jonah offers a $1,000 referral fee if you can help him land contracts.

[38:35] Jonah reminded Tamara that you can battle the status quo. Yet, figure out a way to leverage the system, be complementary, and still be disruptive. Ask yourself, how can I leverage the system to my benefit?

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

SoundGuard Homepage

Jun 19, 2018

Structure and innovation — can they work hand in hand? Can a big company teach us more entrepreneurial spirits about innovation? Michael Arena, Chief Talent Officer at General Motors talks about just that. He shared how he thinks differently about his work and what GM does to stay innovative, as well as his mantra "positively disrupt or be disrupted." We also talk about the importance of scaling and why that matters no matter your size. Whether you feel like you are a cog in a big wheel or the sole innovator, this podcast has some interesting lessons around how structure can foster innovation, not hinder it.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:41] Listeners may be surprised to learn that Michael’s garage is full of motorcycles, not cars and trucks.

[3:09] Michael’s vision for talent at GM is that GM needs to get the best people. He defines talent acquisition, building a robust talent pipeline, and making sure people are fully engaged so that they are leveraging all of their potential. “We are unique in the fact that we do a lot of work around social capital.”

[4:29] How does Michael define the ‘best people’? How do you know that people are in the right role?

[7:11] Social capital is defined as people who you have established trust with. Michael shares that he would rather have someone in the center of the network that can leverage what they know. What makes someone great at leveraging the network? Rob Cross researched organization network. He studied fast movers, people that migrate to the center of the network. He found that fast movers are givers, they help other people, they know that it’s about the team. Fast movers help others be better at what they do. Tamara questions LaunchStreet listeners if they are on the center or on the edge of your own network?

[10:36] Michael believes that today’s organizations need to embrace the mantra, “positively disrupt or be disrupted.” Today, it’s all about speed, swiftness, and agility. Would you rather be disrupted or be the disruptor? Tamara shares that when you aren’t the one disrupting, it takes you by surprise.

[13:00] Listen in to find out why you actually need canaries in the coal mine, people on the fringe of the network.

[14:45] How do you leverage the people on the fringe? Why do you need both external and internal bridges? The first thing an innovator wants to do is to go to the top of the organization and get credit. MIchael believes it’s the dumbest move you can make. You are much better off to find a credible friend that will advocate for you. People will listen and the idea will be energized.

[17:43] Tamara shares that Inside LaunchStreet has created Innovation on Demand. The videos that get watched the most are the ones about how to communicate your ideas. It’s not about the ego driving it, it’s about building the network to help you get your idea accomplished. Michael and Tamara discuss the “they versus them” group.

[21:25] Michael debunks the myth that you have to be startup to scale fast. He shares an example of a small company that was acquired by a very large organization. The smaller company was very unhappy. After relationships were built, they were able to scale the concept over the larger marketplace.

[23:18] Michael believes that you have to disrupt traditional models to scale quickly. You must start to think bimodally, cross-functionally. He talks about discovery connections and development connections.

[27:24] Michael compares launching an invention to an airplane taking off into the wind. Tension helps to build better innovation.

[31:36] Michael shares some nuggets from his new book, Adaptive Space: How GM and Other Companies are Positively Disrupting Themselves and Transforming into Agile Organizations. Companies share both tensions to produce and deliver and adapt and innovate. It’s important to make intentional connections in different intervals in regards to different timing. Discovery, development, and scale each need their own timing. Agility is so critical.

[35:18] Is there one person that owns the whole process of discovery, development, and scale? Tamara talks about the one-way tennis match.

[38:56] Connect with Michael at Adaptive Space and on LinkedIn.

[39:43] Michaels final piece of advice is to make the trade-off between ego and impact. You must be willing to let go of parts of it, the chances of getting it off the ground are much greater.

[40:34] Tamara reminds listeners that structure and innovation can work hand in hand. She challenges us to find the gaps in structure and processes and start to innovate. She shares Southwest Airlines Rap as an example of structured innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Adam Grant

Michael's Linkedin articles

Derek Sivers Ted Talk

Charles OReilly Ambidexterity

Adaptive Space: How GM and Other Companies are Positively Disrupting Themselves and Transforming into Agile Organizations, by Michael Arena

Southwest David Rap

Jun 12, 2018

Yesterday someone asked me, “Tamara what are the rules of the new economy?” I get that question a lot. How do you get ahead? How do you become seen as a power player in your work? With that question in mind, I had Magdalena Yeşil on Inside LaunchStreet. She is a seasoned Silicon Valley Investor (one of the first in SalesForce), founder of several organizations and the author of Power Up! How Smart Women Win in the New Economy. We chat about everything from taking criticism and using it to get better to being a valued voice when you aren’t the most seasoned one of the team.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:35] You might be surprised to learn that Magdalena eats all day long!

[2:49] Find out how being comfortable with being an outsider helped Magdalena to get ahead in the startup venture capital tech world. She learned early to not focus on your differences, but instead to focus on your similarities.

[4:09] How can you leverage being an outsider? Attitude makes all the difference.

[6:26] If you focus on being liked, you have given a lot of power to the other side. If you focus on how good you are about playing the game, it’s all on you. It’s your own skill set. No one else can define you but you. Magdalena shares her childhood story about how she focused on playing the game.

[7:27] What does it mean to be a smart woman? What is the new economy? Magdalena has the answers to these questions in her book, Power-Up! Don’t let the title fool you. The same principles taught in the book apply to men too.

[10:17] Magdalena shares that the book opens with the theme, The Power to Flow. She shares a Turkish custom has been influential in her own life. When someone departs on a journey, the whole neighborhood throws buckets of water on the person. It symbolizing going around the obstacles in the journey and finding the cracks in the rocks for the water to flow through. Tamara reminds listeners to pause and see the water flowing in your own life, giving you power to overcome obstacles.

[12:33] Magdalena shares how to jump over some workplace hurdles. Get introduced to the delicious “f” you attitude. She shares her personal experience of her engineering design review meeting. Her attitude left a tremendous effect on her boss and coworkers.

[16:00] Her ability to remain unflustered and being open to feedback allowed her to improve her design to see success. After the meeting, the men felt like they could continue to give her feedback because she was open and genuinely seeking feedback. We grow by asking for feedback, accepting it and making yourself better.

[18:35] Magdalena shares a powerful strategy for when someone steals your idea at a meeting.

[22:41] What myths can hinder career progress?

[25:21] Is it more important to have a thick skin or be a flexible player?

[26:35] Listen in to find out why having women in the workplace is a competitive advantage. Diversity helps companies receive input and positivity impacts the bottom line. There has to be diversity to really understand what the customer will be doing with our product.

[28:14] Magdalena defines the new economy as any field that’s touched with technology.

[29:45] Innovation does not have a standard formula. Innovation often comes from looking at a problem and saying, “How can I solve this in a different way?” Everyday, Magdalena asks herself what would be the highest leveraging achievement today? She doesn’t leave her office until she has completed that task. Prioritization opens the door to innovation.

[32:21] Tamara believes that we tend to solve yesterday’s problems. We have to figure out ways to look into the future of where we are headed. She advises listeners to look for entrepreneurs that are out there trying to change the game.

[33:57] Connect with Magdalena on her homepage, Twitter, Facebook and on LinkedIn.

[34:26] Magdalena’s final piece of advice is that it’s never to late. Her mother got her first job at age 63. It’s never too late to launch a new career, or to do something you’re not familiar with. It’s never too late to do the exciting stuff you have always wanted to do.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Broadway Angels

Salesforce

Magdalenas homepage

Power-Up! How Smart Women Win In The New Economy, by Magdalena Yeşil

Jun 5, 2018

Do feel like you spend all your time preparing presentations? And even with all that time spent, it feels like none of the ideas you spent all that time of move forward? You aren’t alone. It’s the presentation loop and it's got to stop. Tatiana from KFC asked me how she could get out of the presentation loop and into what I call the “culture of experimentation.” This is where ideas get to breathe life, where you test out the real viability of your thinking. It’s where you stop presenting and start bringing ideas to life. It’s what truly innovative companies do. My co-pilot and I dig deep into the difference and how you can make that transition too.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:22] Tamara believes that the presentation loop squelches innovation. Tamara and co-pilot, Connie Warden, discuss how to get out of the loop so that you can create a culture of experimentation.

[3:10] Tamara recently delivered a keynote speech at the Women’s Foodservice Forum. Tatiana, from KFC, asked, “How do I get out of the deck loop”? Connie asked what a deck is. Tamara describes that a deck is basically a presentation or Powerpoint. The girls discuss the importance of using lingo that your audience understands. They also bring up that it’s so important to ask questions if you don’t know what is being talked about.

[7:00] Tamara believes that when we are stuck in the presentation loop that ideas go nowhere for two reasons. First, we spend all of our time presenting and none of our time doing. Second, It’s hard to gauge the viability of an idea on paper. If we can cut out some presenting time and spend time doing, we will know the viability of the idea and we will know where to spend our time. Connie talks about author, Robert Holden. People are taught to innovate but oftentimes aren’t even sure what idea or problem they are supposed to be working on. Tamara shares that a top retail executive recently came to her but didn’t know how to operationalize innovation. He lacked a focus on how to lead his team in innovation. The focus needs to be on shifting with the market, and harnessing change.

[10:55] How can you get into a mode of experimentation? Tamara shares how Inside LaunchStreet brought Innovation on Demand to life. Connie shares that you have to have courage and that you don’t go from idea to perfection all at once. Tamara and Connie talk about Connie’s idea about stress relief in a box. The first launch never looks like your the idea you envisioned.

[14:48] You can’t go from a Powerpoint to the perfect launch. Tamara thinks that if you can get out of presentation mode, you can move forward. It’s so important to build your idea. People can give response and feedback to physical ideas much easier than a piece of paper. If you can present the model and feedback, you can bring your idea to life much quicker. You are providing validation as to why this idea should move forward.

[16:46] Connie and Tamara discuss the need for courage. You have to be comfortable with people poking holes and not take it as a personal attack or negativity. Get those people to help you fill the holes. Take the feedback from the marketplace and use it to move forward, not shut you down.

[17:04] Find out why you need both “yes anders” and “no butters” to bring your ideas to life. People often shoot down ideas because of how the ideas is presented. Tamara encourages listeners like Tatiana to just do it! Build it, get feedback and then incorporate that into your presentation. People just need to see the difference between presentation and experimentation.

[20:12] It takes courage and a willingness to accept that you’re the first to shift change. Tamara shares that Inside LaunchStreet has developed their own Shark Tank. They each get $50 to experiment and bring an idea to life. Then, they vote on who moves on to the next stage. The ones who move on, get more money to continue testing viability.

[21:44] Tamara encourages Tatiana to think small scale, think consistency and to have courage to be the first one to try it.

[22:02] Tamara challenges listeners to build out their idea. Actually bring it to life and get feedback. Go to Inside Launchstreet to help you get started.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

May 29, 2018

Have you ever wondered why some people are strong managers but some are strong leaders? What’s the difference? And why does having strong leaders foster a culture of innovation and having a strong manager leads to a culture of micro-managers? Fortunately for us, Art Coombs, CEO of KomBea Corporation, speaker and author of Human Connection: How the “L” do we do that? has some great experience and insights for us around this. He stopped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about the importance of the “why” and help us distinguish between managing to the head and leading to the heart. He also has some great things to say about why even the sexiest spreadsheets never move people to action.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:20] You might be surprised to learn that Art is like the modern-day Noah. He is raising two sons, two daughters and two horses.

[2:16] Art’s philosophy of strong leadership has always been to lead with the heart and manage with the mind. Listen in as he talks about the differences between management and leadership. Managers focus on the who, the how, and the when. Leaders focus on the WHY.

[5:59] Is it possible to be both a manager and a leader? Why do most true leaders possess authentic venerability? How does one become both a good manager and a leader? It all has to do with talking about the WHY.

[7:32] Art shares a personal managing failure example about his son’s homework. Art helped his son to discover the WHY in his life as they visit the local Wal-Mart at 2 A.M.

[13:08] Tamara reminds listeners that you need to give people room to self direct. In some ways, leaders have to focus on delayed gratification. Sometimes you have to do the things you need to do today for tomorrow’s benefit. Art suggests to give people the WHY and then step out of their way and they will figure out the how.

[17:46] Art and Tamara discuss why you aren’t motivated to go the extra mile until the heart is convinced that the head has it right. How does leading to the heart help to bring innovation, creativity increased productivity to the workplace? There has to be an emotional connection to the leader and those they lead.

[22:02] Art shares some tips to help create the human connection in the workplace. In this book, The Human Connection: How the L Do we Do That?, he talks about the 5 L's: Living, laughing, learning, leading, and loving. He shares a personal experience about a big mistake that he made and the response from his boss.

[27:32] Art and Tamara continue to discuss innovation. When people feel safe in their environment, innovation naturally sprouts like weeds. Art talks about how we create human connections that last. Great leaders are great cheerleaders. Communication is the key to inspiration. When you invoke an emotion, it goes straight to the heart. Art demonstrated strong leadership while working as a CEO in the call center. He used to dress up like Tarzan, and push a cookie, milk, and banana cart. Art was able to make personal emotional connections while talking to each employee.

[32:55] Art shares a story about Doyle, a worker that was consistently late for work. A co-worker helped Doyle recognize the WHY and that his behavior needed to change not only for work, but for life. Real leaders understand that we aren’t just dealing with assets. We are dealing with humans. The person at home and the person in the office are one in the same.

[36:44] Connect with Art on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or artcoombs.com.

[37:18] Art’s final piece of advice is that people don’t want to be managed, they want to be led.

[37:47] Tamara especially liked the part about how you should think about managing yourself and leading others. Help your team discover their innovation strengths by taking the IQE Assessment.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Human Connection: How The "L" Do We Do That? by Arthur F. Coombs III

KomBea

 

May 22, 2018

Do you know what’s funny? We talk about employee engagement yet no one ever says, “I feel so engaged today!” That disconnect between what we focus on and how we talk about work got me wondering how do you really engage your team? With that question in mind, I asked Cathy Brown, director of Engage For Success, to join me to talk about her perspective that engagement is a social movement, not a definition and why fitting in is killing your leadership and innovation efforts and why bringing your whole self to work should be your number one engagement priority.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:36] You might be surprised to learn that Cathy participates in moristunsa, an English traditional form of dance using bells, sticks, and handkerchiefs.

[3:01] There are many definitions of engagement. Listen in to find out how Cathy defines engagement.

[4:41] What does it mean to bring your whole self to work? What does that look like?

If you’re holding back from being who you really are, you cannot bring your best self to work. Tamara shares that her red ‘power suits’ were not allowing her to be who she really was.

[8:04] How are so many employees feeling disengaged? Cathy quotes that about 30 percent are engaged and really like their job. About 31 percent show up and think that work is OK. And, about 30 percent are totally disengaged, making themselves ill, unproductive, and exhibiting toxic behavior. She believes that the problem is that often we just don’t know what to do to change work engagement.

[10:15] The founders of Engage for Success, David MacLeod and Nita Clarke, performed research to find out what characteristics highly engaged, high performing teams possess. You can find the MacLeod report listing the four enablers of engagement here. First: There’s a strategic narrative that’s living and breathing. Employees know where they fit into the story. Acknowledge the history, the present, and where the employees fit into it. Second: Engaging managers do three things well. They can focus you on the task, trust you to deliver in your way, (they treat you as an individual) and they deal with things that come up quickly. Cathy shares a story that shows the power of managers learning each employee’s names.

[15:49] Third, employee voice, How do people feel about giving you their views? Is their voice welcomed? Do they feel safe? Tamara talks about the black hole that employee’s voices often disappear in. She reminds listeners that you don’t have to take every piece of advice, but do you need to explain what happened to the advice that was shared and why you aren’t taking the advice.

[17:44] Fourth: Organizational integrity. Understanding the values and behavior that are expected. There needs to be trust that the behavior that’s seen is congruent to the values that are exposed.

Cathy talks about Glassdoor and the importance of positive advocates on your staff.

[20:13] Cathy shares a personal story about her working in the IT industry. She understood her role and importance of her job. A good strategic narrative tells each employee WHY they are each there. Employees need to help form strategy and move the narrative forward. Tamara reminds listeners that it’s the front line staff that has lots of the most valuable information.

[23:08] Why does Cathy call engagement a movement?

[24:32] Cathy talks about the third of people that are disengaged with their job. It’s important to know how to go in and change the behavior into a more positive one.

[28:00] Find out the connection between the employees that are engaged and like their job and innovation. (8 enablers of innovation diagnostic map)... There’s a clear relationship to being able to be yourself and innovate. Tamara adds that you must be vulnerable to innovate.

[29:30] How does the culture of innovation contribute to engagement levels?

[30:22] Cathy took the IQE Assessment and her innovator archetype is ‘instinctual risk-taker.’ This means that she connects the dots in new and meaningful ways and is willing to go to new places. How have these skills helped her in her career? Cathy was willing to take problems to upper management and identify where she saw things that needed to be fixed. Tamara reminds listeners that often that means stepping up to places that others haven’t gone yet.

[35:11] Connect with Cathy, and join the newsletter at Engage for Success.

[35:33] Cathy challengers listeners to say thank you today. This is a super positive step that will help with engagement.

[35:57] Tamara believes that fitting in is killing innovation efforts. It’s so important to give people room to be different. She challenges listeners to take the IQE Assessment and then strive to accept and embrace each other’s unique differences.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

MacLeod Report

Engage for Success Homepage

IQE Assessment

 

May 15, 2018

Do you ever think to yourself, “I wish I had a super cool super talent” like an athlete or a celebrity? I know I've thought that too. Envy sets in and I start to feel inadequate. And that’s why I had Mark Henson, author of Ordinary Superpowers, lifelong entrepreneur and the founder of Sparkspace — a unique and exceptional business retreat center in Columbus, Ohio — onto Inside LaunchStreet. He broke down the “only special people” have superpowers myth. In fact, he’ll help you understand how to unlock your Ordinary Superpower. Why ordinary? Because it's probably something you do every single day. In fact, it's so hardwired into you that you may not even see it. He also will help you understand how unlocking your Ordinary Superpowers equals having a greater impact on what matters to you, the people around you. He also shares how the badge of being busy is sucking success out from under you and why living to your Ordinary Superpowers gives you a super-ordinary life.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:41] You might be surprised to know that Mark spun the tunes as a local radio DJ.

[3:40] Why did Mark title his book, Ordinary Superpowers: Unleash the Full Potential of Your Most Natural Talents? Why do we often overlook our own superpowers? To us, they just feel ordinary things like talents, abilities, and skills that allow us to help the most people.

[6:20] Mark shares his ordinary superpowers: exploring new things, simplifying things, communicating through writing and speaking, and including the unincluded.

[6:52] Listen in to find out how you discover your superpowers.

[9:04] How does identifying your superpowers change how you act day to day?

[10:47] Put your first and best efforts into the work that best fits your superpowers. Focus on the things that you have the greatest impact on. Mark shares a personal experience about domestic duties in his household. We often get into habits and don’t think to ask someone else to help out for a while.

[13:58] Mark and Tamara talk about how being busy has become a badge of honor. It leads to the monkey mind thing. The hardest thing is just to sit and ‘be.’

[16:41] Why do we get out of alignment? We have been taught what success looks like. But, often, the path doesn’t align with what our superpowers usually are. Mark shares an experience about advancing with a previous job. His advancement didn’t allow him to use his superpowers, and he was miserable.

[19:22] Superpowers are as vast as there are people in the world. Your superpowers are yours and yours alone. They are like your fingerprint. Some are unique powers like extreme organization, empathy, seeing unmet needs and acting. Tamara identifies her superpowers as being able to see opportunities, communication, seeing things differently, and simplification.

[21:37] There’s a four-part test outlined in Mark’s book that can help you determine if you have identified your unique superpowers. Does it come naturally to you? Do you have an elevated skill or talent above the circle you spend time with? Does it have a positive influence on other people in some way? Does using that power give you energy back?

[24:25] Tamara challenges listeners to buy Ordinary Superpowers, and identify what things people see as your strengths. A good way to identify your potential superpowers is to watch for areas that people ask for help.

[25:23] There’s a chapter in the book titled, “Understanding Your Default Operating System.” Mark shares that the operating system is the underlying system that keeps everything running. Mark thinks that our superpowers are the system that happens by default. Learn how there’s both a light and dark side to superpowers.

[30:19] How does tapping into your superpowers help you lead a superpowered life? It’s all about being authentic to who you are. The first step is to identify your own ordinary superpowers.

[32:15] Does everyone out there have ordinary superpowers?

[34:01] Mark shares that when you identify your authentic self, pure creativity can come out. Tamara reminds us that innovation isn’t about the outcome, it’s about the process. Mark took the IQE Assessment and his archetype is a risk taker imaginative. This helped him to start a successful business. He has reentered his risk-taking arena and continues to fill in the gaps.

[38:10] Tamara reminds listeners that you don’t have to be an ideal fit for everybody. She talks about the perspective of putting your heart and soul into creating something and compares it to the Hollywood movie making business. Tamra and Mark discuss putting your best efforts into making what makes you happy.

[40:55] Connect with Mark here, on Facebook or at A Superpowered Life.

[41:33] Mark challenges listeners to read the poem, Our deepest fear, by Maryanne Williamson. “It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you.” He believes that you will have the biggest impact by being 100 percent YOU!

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Ordinary Superpowers

Sparkspace Homepage

IQE Assessment

Superpower Summit

How I Made This Podcast

Our Deepest Fear Poem

May 8, 2018

When trying to be innovative, do you ever feel like you are just running in place, expending all this energy and not getting anywhere? It could be because you have bought into some of the prevailing innovation myths that are actually sabotaging your efforts. In today’s Q&A session on Inside LaunchStreet, we delve into the top four myths and how to avoid them. Listen in and I bet you'll find that you are probably engaging in one or several of them. No worries, after this podcast you'll get out of those innovation traps and into innovation that ignites impact.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:44] Maureen Berkner Boyt, of Moxie Exchange, asks, what are the biggest myths in innovation that we are all buying into that are sabotaging our work? Tamara believes that we are not only buying into them, but actively engaging in one or more of these myths.

[1:33] Join us on Inside LaunchStreet, as Connie Warden joins Tamara and they discuss four myths that sabotage innovation. First, you must think outside the box to be innovative. Second, innovation is for the select few. Third, innovation is for a certain time. Fourth, when you’re successful, keep doing what’s working and not innovate.

[3:44] Myth #1. You must think outside of the box to be innovative. Get introduced to Tamara’s term, ‘ridonculous’ as they talk about thinking outside of the box. Find out why innovation often goes nowhere. Connie talks about the term,”Houston, we have a problem.” Apollo 13, is a great example of thinking inside the box, shifting and rearranging what you already have.

[6:21] Tamara highlights examples of companies who have shifted and rearranged successfully. Anythink Libraries, has become a place of discovery. They have elevated the library experience.

[11:02] Tamara shares the book, How The Cadillac Got Its Fins: And Other True Tales from the Annals of Business and Marketing, by Jack Mingo. She tells about the successful rise of Greyhound Bus. Connie and Tamara discuss the image of taking public transport and the importance of flipping the box to bring public transport back into popularity. Domino’s Pizza successfully rearranged the box by owning their problems and innovating.

[15:18] Myth #2 Innovation is for the select few, Connie talks about her friend, Keith. He helped his dentist innovate while sitting in the dentist’s chair. The IQE ASsessment was created to bring to dispel the myth that only a select few can innovate. Connie’s IQE is a tweaker, continually making little shifts, until innovation is successful. Tamara’s IQE is an experiential risk taker. That means that she innovates by being uncomfortable. She must build things, to see things. It’s so important to work within your innovation strengths.

[19:47] Connie brings up the idea that most people want to conform. Humans want to be liked, so we conform too much. She shares her experience of a flight attendant. She could tell how people would behave depending on what city they were flying out of. It’s important to bring awareness to the role that we are currently in. Tamara challenges listeners to let everyone innovate in a way that works for them. Leaders need to motivate the team to show courage to innovate in their own way.

[23:29] Myth #3 Innovation is for a certain time. Tamara thinks that innovation is a mindset, it is not a point and time exercise. Our best ideas may already be created. We just need to find them. Tamara shares a personal story about the roadblocks of getting through her ‘to do’ list. In the process of working through the list, she had shut her creative brain down. We need to validate our brains and continually prime the pump.

[28:57] Intuition doesn’t happen just between 8-5. Connie shares an experience about buying coffee for her kids. It’s important to take the intuition from your mind and just deal with it. Tamara reminds us that when intuition flows, it flows. She has a small bucket on her desk that she uses to store her intuition. Be open to listening to your intuition.

[34:49] Myth #4 When you’re successful, keep doing what’s working and not innovate. Connie and Tamara discuss the demise of Sears, Kodak, Blockbuster, Radio Shack, Blackberry, Pan Am, and KMart. These were all once leaders in their category. The marketplace changed and shifted, and these companies did not. Connie chimes in that things are changing at a much quicker rate than before. Tamara share the success of Starbucks and that they recognized that they were getting complacent. You cannot rest on your success.

[38:02] Do you need to be constantly changing and innovating as humans?

Is it possible to change too much?

[40:45] Tamara recaps the four myths of innovation.

[42:00] Tamara challenges listeners to visit the blog and look for the ways you can engage today in smart innovation practices.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Moxie Exchange Webpage

IQE Assessment

May 1, 2018

I was sitting in the common area of the WeWork, where we office, and I overheard the most fascinating conversation. They were talking about how they were struggling because it felt like nothing was behind the curtain in business anymore, that the customer wanted to know everything about you — not just if you had a good product or service, but everything — the good, the bad, and definitely the ugly. And you know what, they are right. Transparency is a must if a business wants to thrive. So, that’s why I asked Billee Howard to come on Inside LaunchStreet and share her insights. She is the author of We Commerce — an incredible book about the new economy and Founder + CEO of BRANDthropologie Media, a firm identifies the most powerful collision point of culture and commerce for each client to create captivating story-driven experiences that drive emotional and authentic engagement. I think you’ll find our discussion — around what it looks like to thrive in the We Economy and why having a purpose is as important as a product — valuable. I thought our convo about why the heart matters more than the mind was super insightful.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:24] You might be surprised to know that Billee creates in the kitchen while listening to the music that a seventy-year-old man would enjoy.

[3:51] Billee specializes in harnessing creativity to solve business problems. How is using creativity different in solving problems?

[5:26] Find out why Billee believes that storytelling and creativity are the currency of business in the new economy.

[7:24] Listen is as Billee talks about the ‘me’ to the ‘we’ shift in business strategies. Get introduced to Billee’s definition of a ‘we’ economy.

[9:30] Why is storytelling more important than ever? People no longer want to have just transactions with brands. They want to have interactions and experiences. Tamara reminds listeners that it’s easy to get the transaction done, but you have to be more thoughtful to build an interaction.

[12:04] Why do businesses often stop short of emotional satisfaction? Billee shares that Seventh Generation is delivering on their business purpose. They are leaving the world better than they found it for seven generations to come. Tom's Shoes is also hitting it out of the park with the meaningful interaction they play in the community.

[15:25] Is there a connection to your team internalizing your business purpose and bringing creative ideas to the table? Culture is everything today.

[18:09] Tamara shares that Inside Launchstreet holds a quarterly campfire where they eat S'mores and share stories. This has created a powerful ‘we’ culture.

[19:47] Billee talks about using the power of technology with the creativity side of marketing. There is a tremendous amount of opportunity to connect customer emotion to brand performance. Brands have a fifty percent increased likelihood of achieving the desired outcome if they infuse emotions into the process. Empathy is a critical component in everything that you put forward to the world.

[22:04] Tamara talks about growing up in a workplace where emotions were checked in at the door. She shares a story about her friend experiencing a powerful negative emotional reaction to a brand. Billee believes that business can no longer remain emotionless. Consumers want a brand to believe in.

[25:21] How do you drive engagement with your customer’s heart?

[27:00] Brands have become emotionally illiterate. People have not had a need for emotional literacy. Tamara and Billee talk about both Pepsi and Dove faux pas.

[29:13] Businesses consult Billee when they realize that purpose is no longer a marketing ploy. Purpose is a critical thing that needs to define a company’s future. The goal is to best capture customer emotion and connect with it in a way that’s going to really drive performance.

[31:31] Find out how did Billee became an IBM futurist. Tamara thinks that Billee’s archetype is instinctual collaborative on the IQE Assessment.

[33:49] Connect with Billie at Brandthropologie, on LinkedIn, and on Twitter.

[34:11] Billee introduces her book, We Commerce. She believes that you must have an appetite for change and disruption in order to be successful. Collaboration must be a part of business strategy. To be the best in the world, you must constantly push yourself to a place that you are uncomfortable.

[36:00] Tamara reminds listeners that ‘we’ commerce is not a flavor of the month. It’s how we should be doing business. Your purpose should be infused in everything that you do.

[37:30] Tamara asks listeners to write a review on iTunes if you find value in listening to InsideLaunchstreet.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Brandthropologie Homepage

We Commerce: How to Create, Collaborate, and Succeed in the Sharing Economy,
by Billee Howard

Centiment

Apr 24, 2018

The other day, I watched the Defiant Ones on HBO and it got me thinking. Why do some people seem to always be ahead of change while the rest of us are struggling to keep up? What thought process or system do they use that would help the rest of us? And with that thought in mind, I had Jurgen Appelo, author of How To Change The World and president of Agile Scales to talk about his Super Model of Change. We chat about how doing what we've always done, faster, isn't the answer. It's actually about how we need to decide to change faster. We also dig into how successful companies die because they are successful and how to create an idea virus (it's a good thing).

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:44] You might be surprised to learn that Jurgen’s first piece of artwork was published on his kindergarten teacher’s wedding invite.

[2:56] Jurgen calls himself a creative networker. Listen in to learn about creative networking. How do you turn knowledge into creativity?

[6:10] Why is teaching people “how to manage” outdated and irrelevant? Agility is applied to the entire businesses. Hierarchies are most successful when they are turned into networks of self-organizing people. Management is not going away, it’s simply turning into something different.

[8:10] Jurgen shares success of a small company in Paris that is ahead of the curve in management. They have self-organizing teams, people setting their own goals and using OKRs (setting targets for yourself). Time is set aside during business hours for employees to learn. Tamara believes that it can be to our advantage to be small, organized and agile.

[13:00] Legacy culture is difficult to leave behind. Companies change slowly. Individual behavior changes much quicker than companies. It is often easier to start from scratch with a startup company than wait for change within an existing company.

[14:38] Why is it so important to have an agile culture in business today? Survival nowadays means that we have to adapt faster to the changing environment. It is not just about doing things faster. It’s about deciding that what you’ve been doing isn't making sense anymore. You must do something different. Tamara reminds listeners that it’s about making the decision to change faster than what we have done in the past.

[16:33] The Innovator's Dilemma The Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail (Management of Innovation and Change) helps readers understand that successful companies die because they are successful. At times, they don’t try the new, scary, risky things, and this brings on death. The time to be thinking about a new direction is when you have a lot of profit. Tamara tells people to watch the Defiant Ones on HBO. It tells the story about Jimmy Lovine and Dr. Dre realizing that they are big fish in a shrinking pond.

[19:14] Jurgen developed a Change Management Supermodel 3,0 It’s about changing behavior in organizations, and convincing the organization to move in a different direction. First, you need to dance with the system (PDCA cycle). Realize that whatever we try, the influence will go both ways. Second, change individual people within the organization (ADKAR model for change). Third, Ideas jump in the network from person to person. It’s called the adoption curve, or the idea virus. Fourth, Change is often initiated by the environment.

[22:44] Tamara asks if a creative cafe would be a good change in the environment for a board meeting? Use the environment to your advantage. How about using the coffee machine as a gathering place to discuss change? Tamara shares a story about walking into the grey cubicles of IBM. A tiny shift in our environment can make a huge difference in the change model.

[26:25] Jurgen discusses writing thank you cards in the form of a kudos box. A CEO in Poland told Jurgen that the kudos box was the best idea he has introduced. Employees love writing and receiving compliments from their peers. This helps the team to decide who is doing what well.

[29:59] Does having an agile culture inherently make the culture more innovative? Where does happiness fit into agility and staying ahead of the curve?

[33:14] Tamara brings up the fact that happier people contribute more and are more creative.

[33:28] Jurgen shares a tip to managing happiness. He really sees value in Tip #2, mind maps. Draw your name in the middle of the paper and begin mind mapping, writing whatever words come to mind that describe you. Then ,the team starts asking questions about your map. This is a fun, onboarding exercise to get to know each other better and make connections.

[35:48] Connect with Jurgen at his homepage, his blog, Management 3.0 and Agility Scales.com.

[36:25] Jurgen leaves listener's with a valuable piece of advice: Be weird, but not too weird. You need to be similar enough for organizations to believe in what you’re doing and have credibility. At the same time, your ideas need to be outside of their comfort zone, but within their stretch zone.

[39:13] Tamara challenges LaunchStreeters to do the mindmaps exercise with your team. She challenges listener’s to take the IQE Assessment. This will help you to understand how the mindmaps show up in their personal lives as well as their work. It will help you see a more holistic view of who each team member is and ideas of how to tap into their strengths.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Innovators Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail (Management of Innovation and Change), by Clayton M. Christensen

Jurgen's Homepage

How To Change the World. Change Management 3.0, by Magdalena Wszelaki

Agility Scales

IQE Assessment


Apr 17, 2018

When do you think about marking off all the things on your to-do list? Things like making a doctor’s appointment, asking an online store where your order is, making reservations? If you are like me, it's at odd hours of the day when I then can't do anything about it. I hate it! Well so did Matt Tumbleson, founder of Teckst, a revolutionary technology in the customer service space. He stopped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk to me about taking risks and what it takes to be a successful disruptor trying to transform a legacy industry or organization. He dropped some wisdom bombs around how to innovate within constraints versus always fighting them and how caring about how you can help others feel and be innovative is more important than you being the lone innovator is the difference between feeling amazing and actually moving innovation forward. He ends with how partnerships equal buy-in.

 

Key Takeaways:

[3:00] You might be supposed to learn that Matt developed an obsession as a kid with airplanes. He grew up in Florida around all things NASA.

[5:07] Matt’s took the IQE Assessment and his innovator archetype is inquisitive imaginative. He excels in the startup world by tackling problems and constantly improving things. Matt talks about his vision for perfection and how he views ‘getting there.’

[7:26] What mindset can innovators learn from entrepreneurs like Matt? He believes that being able to take risks means that you potentially have a reward.

[9:22] Tamara and Matt discuss risks and question if it's necessary to take risks to the ‘max’ to create a change.

[10:39] What inspired Matt to start Teckst?

[15:35] Matt realized that people wanted to reach out but not by phone. He understood the need to create something that didn’t exist. He found himself thinking about many tasks he needed to do and started thinking about how to utilize texting.

[19:49] The inquisitive type comes out when Matt talks about innovating by asking questions. He also challenges assumptions and asks, what if? How would I do this when I connect the dots?

[20:08] What lessons has Matt learned while disrupting in a legacy environment? It’s not the people that don’t want to be innovative. It’s the legacy and the processes that are making it hard for them to move the needle. Matt believes it’s imperative to identify who the end user will be. We come together and connect the dots. The users will see their input manifest in the end result.

[23:24] Tamara reminds listeners that sometimes we have a box that we have to deal with. Matt wanted to be sure that with Teckst, he created something that was within the constraints of the users and the legacy systems. He partnered with his clients so that they are innovating too.

[25:44] Matt talks about his view of partnership and the overused 1+1=3 equation.

[29:17] Tamara reminds listeners that it’s so important to get buy-in. You can eliminate risks when there is no black curtain and everyone knows what’s happening.

[31:27] Tamara reminds listeners that risk can sometimes feel like raising your hand in a meeting and going against consensus. Matt teaches that you’re allowed to say no and issued criteria that everyone can all agree on. By allowing people to say no, that opens the door for improvements. We can move innovation forward faster.

[33:02] Tamara shares that in InsideLaunchstreet, people can come to her with a problem, but first they have to create three solutions. This allows innovative people to solve their own problems. Matt believes that you also need a forum to talk about what you did.

[38:15] Matt holds the title of CEO but relies heavily on his team of experienced innovators to help him innovate. Tamara points out that building a team builds trust and opens the door for innovation. What problems are companies experiencing when they reach out to Matt?

[40:36] Find our why Matt believes innovation is a key factor in today’s fast-paced marketplace. Tamara discusses the pitfalls of attempting to single out a certain group of consumers.

[44:48] Connect with Matt on LinkedIn, or text him at 917-971-3557. Or, use Teckst at 855-980-6848.

[45:45] Tamara digs into Matt’s innovative archetype. She asks Matt how being imaginative and inquisitive has helped him to achieve his final goal. Matt challenges listeners to brainstorm and think about what is the worst way to solve a problem. Start with a terrible idea, flip it, and you’ll have a great idea!

[48:25] Tamara challenges listeners to be the disruptor. Discover your innovator archetype by taking the IQE Assessment today. It starts with YOU.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

Mentioned in This Episode:

GrubHub Homepage

Teckst Homepage

Apr 10, 2018

I bet you know that there’s a big difference between collaboration and consensus — where even the best ideas get watered down into the worst. And that there’s a difference in when to gather input and when to take action. My co-pilot, Connie Warden, and I dig into all of that and more in this Q&A episode of Inside LaunchStreet. I also share the time I was in advertising when Steve, our creative genius, didn't show up and the rest of us lowly everyday people had to be the ones with the brilliant ideas. You'll be amazed at what happens when people are given the chance to add input and you'll be even more surprised at who has the best ideas. It's not who you think, that I promise. We also talk about what to do when it's time to stop gathering and start taking action. And all that relates to how to build a process and culture where collaborative leadership drives the right ideas forward.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:01] Connie Warden joins Inside LaunchStreet to address a question from Jonah Grainger. He asks, is there such a thing as too much collaboration? Tamara believes that often we confuse collaboration with consensus. You never get to a decision because you’re trying to get everyone's decisions.

[2:54] Find out why Tamara and Connie think consensus doesn’t work. Tamara defines collaboration as the right people at the table, talking about the right things at the right time.

[5:56] How do you know when the right people are at the table?

[8:20] The mistake people often make is bringing the whole net of people and trying to reach consensus. It’s important to note their contributions and explain that you heard and value their ideas. Then, get the right team to move forward with the decision-making process.

[10:56] Tamara points out that often, the front line isn’t getting thanked or asked to provide input. Tamara shares an experience about a manufacturing company in Japan. Listen in to find out how the janitor solved the problem while standing on the train platform. Connie chimes in that it takes open-mindedness to value everyone’s opinion.

[13:28] Tamara and Connie discuss why the front line is often unseen.

[16:07] Tamara shares a personal story about when she was working on Madison Avenue. She was assigned the job of putting together a meeting between the creative genius, Steve, and the client. Find out what happens when Steve doesn’t show up to craft the creative strategy of the year. Collaborative leadership occurred without Steve!

[20:56] Without Steve in the room, everyone had permission to say the things they had all been thinking about. Connie talks about how much we work on our self-image, rather than what is authentically within us.

[22:22] Connie shares how her birthday Ninja story helped her to discover that your image isn’t important. It’s who you really are that’s important. Tamara reminds listeners that Connie was focusing on the wrong thing.

[26:44] Connie points out that we hide behind something, whatever we fear. We fear that we may not appear like we know it all. Connie and Tamara talk about the book, Braving the Wilderness. It’s OK to say, I don’t know it all.

[28:10] Tamara wraps up the conversation by saying that collaboration is a little bit messy. When you feel like there's too much collaboration, you have actually moved away from consensus. Follow the four phases of successful collaboration — One: casting the wide net. Give people permission to be vulnerable. Two: Have the right people at the table at the right time. Three: feedback loop. Helping people to feel valued and heard. Four: action/communication.

[30:06] Tamara challenges listeners to take real collaboration a test drive!

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Snack Food Business

The One Thing

Braving the Wilderness

Connie's Homepage

IQE Assessment

 

Apr 3, 2018

Does it ever feel like the marketplace is moving quickly outside your windows? Yet, the process you’re using inside those windows is moving slower than a turtle on a hot day. I know, I’ve been there — I totally get it. A lot of long-shooters feel this way. Sometimes, I feel like there’s this major disconnect between the change that we have to manage and how we manage it. It’s hard to truly innovate with a disconnect like that. So, Jason Little — author of Lean Change Management and the video series, Agile Transformation — came by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about how we can shake up our thinking and our processes to be more agile and innovate. We chat about how the key to lasting change isn’t about the processes you use — it’s actually about the people first — then, the processes. We also dig into why a set plan does not actually increase certainty and results — In fact, it decreases them. It’s not the plan; it’s the process of planning that minimizes uncertainty.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:16] You might be surprised to learn that Jason knows a former guitar player of the popular American heavy metal band, Megadeth.

[3:20] Agile is a powerful tool in helping manage change; It helps you understand your market, your context, and focus less on the process and tools, and more on individuals and interactions.

[4:29] Why some companies have stayed so antiquated with their change processes: Uncertainty.

[5:19] Is the need for certainty keeping us from managing change well? Jason says our brains are not wired for uncertainty which makes it difficult to implement change.

[6:25] How do you make change happen when you don’t feel uncertain? Jason believes changes within a company happens the same way a social change is made; It takes a community rallying together.

[7:44] Everyone needs to see the same problem that you see for change to happen. It’s not about buy-in; it’s about people seeing the same problem that you see.

[9:16] Why we can’t manage transformations the same way we manage an infrastructure project: Change doesn’t follow those schedules.

[10:42] Companies need someone to “shake things up” when pushing for change, transformation, and innovation — not someone authoritative and well-organized.

[12:28] What we should take away from Agile, what works about it, and what challenges we should be mindful of when trying to implement this type of process.

[15:03] Jason’s powerful experiences of helping implement Agile with an organization, bringing about incredible change. It’s all about de-risking and fixing the initial problem, then adding and fixing the secondary aesthetics after.

[16:46] Jason believes that testing out changes as you go, brutal transparency, and having a dialogue with customers is key to the success of implementing new changes.

[17:46] Does having transparency in the process help improve work ethics? Jason thinks so. When you can’t hide your work you become more raw and work more efficiently.

[19:45] How positive friction drives progress. You need someone who can challenge some of the ideas — acting as an anchor or counterbalance — to provide good, positive conflict.

[21:13] Jason shares a story about his first Agile coaching job.

[23:51] Organizations and situations that Agile is not right for. Jason says it’s all about risk vs. reward.

[25:49] “Manage change like a rockstar”; Jason’s take on how being a project manager can be fun, cool, and different. We don’t have to follow the same old step-by-step process.

[27:55] Jason’s “zumba method” shows how change happens in an organization. Through starting a conference with “spontaneous” dancing, he can figure out who is ready to drive change and who is resisting.

[29:47] People who show up to elective meetings are on the extreme ends — those who are extremely motivated to implement change, and the resisters who believe it will never work.

[30:22] How Agile helps a team or organization create a culture of innovation long-term. For Jason, it depends on how well the organization supports the people who are doing it. You don’t have to transform your whole organization. Let the people doing the work have a say in deciding how to do it.

[31:44] About Jason’s book Lean Change Management and how it can help organizations can shift.

[32:19] Where to connect with Jason and learn more: LeanChange.org.

[32:27] One piece of advice from Jason’s book that long shooters can take action on right now: “The people who write the plan don’t fight the plan.” Let the people who have to live with the consequences create the plan — then help them execute it.

[33:39] Tamara has one question for listeners: Who in your organization can be the one that can help you ignite and drive innovation? Go find that person and make them your champion. And if you’re not sure how to connect with them, Tamara has got you covered. Go to Innovation on Demand to get the video on the secrets to getting buy-in to your ideas.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Lean Change Management: Innovative Practices For Managing Organizational Change, by Jason Little

Agile Transformation A Guide to Organizational Change

LeanChange.org

 

Mar 27, 2018

Did you know that you need to spend time with people you don’t agree with? It’s not always easy, but it will help you be more innovative and make better decisions. Jennifer Riel, author of Creating Great Choices, and an adjunct professor at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, specializing in creative problem solving, stopped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about all this. We dig into how to challenge our own thinking with the opposite views of others and why people with different perspectives help us get to more rich and robust ideas. She also shares the key to better decision making, including Integrative Thinking, creating more tension and why seeking to fall in love with other people’s perspectives is the best thing you can do.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:54] You might be surprised to know that Jennifer is a Canadian that has never played hockey. However, she has fallen on her behind many times curling.

[2:57] Jennifer finds meaningful value in spending time with people that see the world differently than you. You mind forms incomplete models. The only way you have a hope of challenging your thinking and improving your model is by talking to people that don’t see what you see. It’s a valuable way to learn and make your own thinking richer and more robust.

[5:04] Jennifer shares a personal story about teaching a group of healthcare leaders that resulted in opposite views regarding vaccines.

[8:10] Why is it hard for us to internalize opposing, provocative, differing views?

[10:19] Learn the keys to better decision making and get introduced to the term ‘integrative thinking,’ Learn how to create great choices rather than to choose between existing options.

[12:13] How do you know when the solutions on the table are the right options? How can your emotional reaction propel you to continue to seek other options? Tamara reminds LaunchStreet listeners that if you feel like you’re compromising or settling, that’s when you keep seeking.

[14:21] Start looking at other options by diving into the most opposing of the choices in front of you. Then, seek to fall in love with the options. Ask yourself, what would be truly great with each of the options? Look at decentralization and then centralization. The more tension you can produce, the greater insight you will receive.

[17:21] Jennifer believes that many times we limit our emotional selves in business. Falling in love with the model means that you go beyond finding the good in the model. Tamara teaches that ‘leaving emotions at the door’ works against us. Humans add value through emotion and innovation.

 

 

[20:51] When we fall in love, we get to see why it’s valuable and the benefits the model provides. Tamara challenges listeners to complete an exercise and unpack the ‘what.’

[22:42] Are best practices always best?

[25:49] Tamara questions if we focus on best practices because it gives us an anchor to start with. Jennifer breaks best practices into two categories: heuristic and algorithmic. You need to loosen things up a bit to embrace the intention.

[29:01] Jennifer shares some surprises she experienced while about writing her book, Creating Great Choices: A Leader's Guide to Integrative Thinking, by Jennifer Riel and Roger L. Martin.

[31:11] How do you get the people at the table to get on board? Jennifer thinks it’s powerful to demonstrate your own willingness to question your own model first. If we are genuinely curious fairly consistently, cognitive bias starts to work for us.

[34:35] Connect with Jennifer at Rogerlmartin.com,

Rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/Faculty/FacultyBios/RielJennifer, and on Twitter

[34:59] Jennifer shares why it is important to focus on great choices. Listen in as Jennifer defines strategy. Jennifer challenges listeners to think about how you define your job in regards to choices. Do you see yourself as one who is able to take the raw materials the world gives you and create innovative ideas?

[36:00] Tamara has learned that creative conflict is essential yet it can go bad fast. You need to set the stage in a way that avoids the traps. Go to Innovation on Demand to learn how to create constructive criticism.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

Mentioned in This Episode:

Creating Great Choices: A Leader's Guide to Integrative Thinking, by Jennifer Riel and Roger L. Martin

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion,
by Jonathan Haidt

Good To Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't, by Jim Collins

Mar 20, 2018

Let's get real for a moment. Have you ever had an idea that you thought was brilliant? Maybe it would make a massive impact on your bottom line. Or maybe it would solve your company's biggest challenges? So many of us have had those ideas. So what did you do with it? Did you shove it deep down into the recesses of your mind because you didn't have the time or energy to pursue it? Did you rush to present it to those key stakeholders and they shot it down before it could even breath life? So many of our ideas die early before they've even hit daylight. So that got me thinking… why… why do so many ideas hit the graveyard so early? And with that question in my mind, I asked Mark Aramli, the inventor of BedJet® to come onto Inside LaunchStreet. He has taken a simple idea for keeping your bed at just the right temperature and turned it into a massive business.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:38] You might be surprised to learn that Mark is the world’s biggest supernerd. His favorite sci-fi show is Doctor Who.

[3:46] Mark shares his experimental journey through founding BedJet. The first BedJet® was designed on his kitchen table.

[6:15] Listen in to find out the magic formula Mark has used to compete with the big dogs to create a superior product and end up with the number-one-ranked product in its class.

[10:33] Tamara talks about her uncomfortable personal story about using a heating blanket. The BedJet® can create a sauna-like heat in sixty seconds.

[12:20] Mark has learned that you don’t need million dollar budgets to create new products and services.

[14:45] Mark believes that there’s no upside to biding your time. Time and time again, the value of the idea is meaningless unless you act upon it. He shares a case study about filing patents for BedJet®. The value is not really in the idea, it’s a warehouse full of products that you can sell.

[17:36] Why is the chasm so large from idea to testing viability? Mark feels that most people just don’t know the first steps to run the process. There are both a knowledge and a money gap. The biggest piece of advice he can give entrepreneurs is to hang on to your day job as long as you possibly can. It’s a big mistake to jump all the way in.

[21:30] Should you pursue all of your “aha” moments? Mark and Tamara discuss Mark’s Shark Tank experience. Mark reminds listeners that the only opinion that matters is the paying customers that open their wallets to buy it. You must validate with customers. Tamara shares the inception of Tough Mudder.

[25:40] Mark was not prepared that the Shark Tank would instantly hate his product. Even so, the takeaway was hugely positive. The episode aired the week he started shipping BedJet®. Mark believes that it’s imperative to have a thick skin and an internal well of persistence and resilience to start a successful business.

[30:05] Tamara’s dad gave her some powerful advice. “Remember when you’re up, that you were once down. And, remember when you’re down, that you were once up.”

[30:36] What’s in the future for BedJet®? Mark’s advises that it’s very dangerous to be a one trick pony.

[32:53] Tamara asks LaunchStreeters to think about how they can get a BedJet® and what formula they are developing to do things differently than the competition.

[33:26} Connect with Mark at BedJet.com and at info@bedjet.com.

[33:45] Get introduced to the three pizza rule. Find out why Mark follows the one pizza rule.

[34:42] Mark leaves LaunchStreeters with his top piece of advice: Seek the customer’s validation. Friends and family are a bit biased. Tamara talks about renting a mall kiosk, it's a great way to gather feedback.

[37:04] Tamara asks listeners what you are going to do today to bring your ideas to life and get feedback. Go to Innovation on Demand to help bring your ideas to light.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

The Art of War, by Sun Tzu

How To Be Awesome at Your Job Podcast

BedJet Homepage

Mar 13, 2018

Yesterday someone told me the saddest thing. They said that their boss told them, and I quote, “You need to be more creative. I’m not sure what that means but I know you need more of it.” Ummm, hello — how are you supposed to improve something when you don‘t even know what it means. How will you know if you are successful? No clue. And that’s why I invited Tina Seeling, a Professor of the Practice in Stanford University and author of the book Creativity Rules, to have a convo on Inside LaunchStreet. You’ll appreciate our conversation around instead of going directly to solutions, taking time to reframe the problem and her feeling that ideas are free, not cheap … and other creative exercises to spark new thinking.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:56] You might be surprised to know that Tina is using New Yorker magazine covers to create collages.

[4:40] Tamara reminds Lauchstreeters that you don’t need to be good at art, you just need to do it and have some fun with it.

[6:29] Part of unlocking creativity is about getting out of your routine and habit. It allows you to connect and combine things in really interesting ways.

[7:16] Tina is a neuroscientist by training but she believes that it all comes down to creative problem-solving. Every trade needs the tools for creative problem-solving.

[8:27] Our school system is not tuned to stimulate creativity, partly because it’s hard to measure. Tamara points out that we often try to measure things when they aren’t there. Tamara and Tina have a discussion around the equation 5 + 5 and where the creativity happens in solving this problem.

[11:40] Tina teaches that the questions you ask are the frame into which the answers will fall. If you don’t ask the right question, you won’t create the space to come up with the solutions. Tina shares examples on how to reframe the questions. Get introduced to the term, “framestorm.”

[15:06] Tamara shares Dollar Shave Clubs example of reframing the question. The owner was asking the forward-thinking question, how do I make the shaving experience hassle-free?

[16:02] Tina explains that creative ideas are new to you. Innovative ideas are new to the world. Defining creativity helps you to push past the idea and help you to innovate.

You have to have shared vocabulary and to share the foundation. Tina defines in her book, Creativity Rules, important shared vocabulary. Imagination: envisioning things that don’t exist. Creativity: applying your imagination to address some sort of challenge. Innovation: applying the creativity to come up with a solution. Entrepreneurship: applying creativity to scale and bringing it to the world. Tina calls this the invention cycle because the end leads back to the beginning.

[19:00] How do leaders get the invention cycle moving? Why do you need both an attitude and and action?

[20:25] Tina teachers the different stages of the invention cycle: imagination, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneuring. Learn how Khan Academy was born.

[25:16] Tamara shares her recent weight loss story. Her focus was on things she can do every single day, instead of an exact number to reach. By reframing her goal, she was able to see success. Often, it’s the little things that help to create success. Focus on changing the one percent. Over time, the compounding value is so great.

[29:17] Tina believes that when you get a job, you don’t get a job. You get the keys to the building. Observe all areas in which you can contribute. Tamara reminds LaunchStreeters that today’s job is not about what they hired you to do. You must push forward, this will allow you to creatively problem solve.

[30:44] Tina took the archetype assessment, IQE, and her power triggers are imaginative instinctual. The imaginative side is all about novel ideas, things from scratch. Tina’s reframing and the one percent fit this type to a T. The instinctual connect the dots in new and meaningful ways. Tina reminds us that we all can stretch and get better through creative exercises. She talks about the Six Thinking Hats and how each hat is required in the conversation and helps us problem solve.

[36:12] Find out why you need both “yes anders and yes butters.” Tina teaches that it’s important to know when in the process to engage the black hat “yes butters.”

[37:20] What is the hardest part of the cycle? Coming up with the ideas or the implementation? Ideas are not cheap, they’re free. The creativity is woven through the entire process. It isn’t a one-time thing.

[39:16] Tina and Tamara provide ways to brainstorm new ideas and open the door to new solutions.

[42:04] Connect with Tina on Twitter, and on her webpage.

[42:31] Tina challenges listeners to engage today! Do something different, really pay attention. Spend an hour observing and look for interesting opportunities to unfold.

[43:04] Tamara reminds listeners that the first step of innovation is being empowered. Take the IQE Assessment today to help you get started!

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Creativity Rules: Get Ideas Out of Your Head and into the World, by Tina Seelig

IQE Assessment

Six Thinking Hats

Tina's webpage

 

Mar 6, 2018

Do you ever think to yourself, “Wait, that worked for so and so that had the same challenge, why didn't it work for me?” I just had that experience yesterday with something I was working on. WTF right? And I think this is especially true when we are dealing with big challenges. I think part of that is the difference between being having change happen to you, and actually being a change leader. And that’s why I had Andy Sheppard, author of The Incredible Transformation of Gregory Todd, and a well-known expert in the area of helping organizations craft constructive change and to be leaders in change as well on Inside LaunchStreet. The conversation is all about change leadership and what it takes to get it done.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:24] You might be surprised to know that Andy can insert a credit card into his mouth, both widthwise and depthwise.

[3:31] Why is managing change such an important skill right now?

[4:24] Andy believes that we can’t implement sustained change unless we know how to lead it. Andy’s specialty is extreme change, requiring both behavioral change and system change.

[8:06] Is change about managing through a specific change or about finding a way to leverage change in an ongoing way?

[9:05] Tamara reminds LaunchStreeters to identify change that is connected. It makes a difference when you take your role and figure out how to connect the dots. You must be looking at the connected whole.

[10:03] Andy believes that a pitfall we get into is trying to emulate what we observe rather than applying the principles of our own situation. Read about this in How To Become The Toyota of Your Industry. This can often create more problems than you can solve. Tamara reminds LaunchStreeters to put other’s best practices into your own context and take the principles out of them and not necessarily the tactics.

[13:51] Andy shares that a good change leader is able to look at the physical practices but also unseen changes. You also need to look at principles and have a process that is guided by your principles. The right roles and responsibilities of who’s leading the change must be examined. Andy highlights an experience about how a CEO’s questions set him up for successful change.

[17:24] How does the culture determine if change will be successful?

[20:26] Tamara cautions LaunchStreeters and those leading change not to rush into it. Think about how it’s going to impact others not only today but down the road.

[23:46] Listen in to find out why you need some sense of urgency in change. How does inertia kill our change efforts?

[25:08] Andy took the IQE Assessment to determine his innovator archetype. His archetype is experiential futuristic. Experiential learners learn in motion. You innovate by doing. Futuristic is all about tomorrow. You are ten steps down the road. Andy is great about change management because he’s all about doing but also thinking about the implications of change.

[28:03] Andy’s book, The Incredible Transformation of Gregory Todd, is a business book written as a novel. This helps you to be immersed in a situation so that you can go apply everything in a live environment.

[31:01] Andy hopes that readers of his book come away with a flavor of what it means to lead change and practice everything together.

[33:42] Connect with Andy at AJSheppard.com and on Linkedin.com/in/ajsheppardchangeleadership.

[34:07] Andy advises LaunchStreeters to be prepared to unlearn everything you already know about change. Challenge your own assumptions. He shares a personal experience about managing change.

[37:53] Tamara reminds listeners that you can all be change leaders. Look at the blogs and podcasts on LaunchStreet.com to get started.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

The Incredible Transformation of Gregory Todd: A Novel about Leadership and Managing Change, by A J Sheppard

The 48 Laws of Power, by Robert Greene

Feb 27, 2018

In my travels, I meet a lot of entrepreneurs that claim to have an idea that is going to totally disrupt their category. Sadly, it's rarely the case — sorry, but it's true. But then I met Henry Schwartz, one of the Founders of MobCraft Beer. Their entire business model is disruptive. He popped by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about how putting the customer in the driver seat has been the secret sauce to their success and how to transform experimentation from something you fear to a part of your business model.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:56] You may be surprised to learn that Henry once had dreadlocks and backpacked to 37 countries before he graduated college. Listen in as Henry talks about pairing his passion to skateboarding. He opened his first store at age 15.

[5:29] Henry lives by the tagline, we turn ideas into beer. People submit flavor ideas, an election is held, and then the flavor winner comes and helps to produce the winning beer. The entire process is crowdsourced. Each beer is crowdfunded.

[8:15] Listen in to find out what lessons Henry has learned along his journey.

[9:42] MobCraft’s unique distribution model has helped to contribute to their success. They have learned to market the product in many different ways. MobCraft is celebrating their 50th month of crowdsourced beers!

[11:48] Find out how the king of fruit, that tastes like heaven but smells like hell, became durian beer, a sweet mango, custard beer.

[13:46] How does Henry view experimentation, failure, and risk? MobCraft scales down their recipe until they ensure that it’s the perfect batch. Tamara advises LaunchStreeters to batch out your innovation and test small experimentations.

[16:53] Disruptive innovation requires that you pivot. It’s really easy to get comfortable. Agility, and thinking inside the box helps you to make decisions. Tamara likes to think of it as rearranging the box.

[18:37] Henry took the Innovation Quotient Edge Assessment and his innovator archetype is imaginative futuristic. The imaginative edge helps Henry to see innovation in blank spaces and to create new novel approaches. The Futuristic edge enables him to pivot, be adaptable and see into the future.

[21:17] MobCraft’s success in disrupting innovation is due to the fact that Henry is always thinking about the next thing. Tamara talks about the importance of the team. It helps you to balance and determine what sequence to follow. She cautions about following your competitor and the importance of owning your own space.

[23:26] Henry talks about swimming with the sharks in the Shark Tank! Find out what he took away from this experience.

[26:57] Tamara loves that MobCraft is an experience from start to finish. Henry shares a story about a phone call from a fan in Florida.

[29:12] How does having excited, wide-eyed customers visit the brewery help your team to stay motivated? The consumer is in the driver’s seat experiencing direct emotional connections.

[31:19] Henry looks for feedback for both personal preference and quality issues. He cautions to dig deeper and get accurate feedback for your product.

[32:53] Connect with Henry on Twitter, Instagram, and henry@mobcraftbeer.com. Vote on the next flavor of beer at MobCraft Beer.

[33:48] Henry tells Launchstreeters the way to disrupt innovation is to do the thing that makes you afraid.

[34:25] Tamara asks listeners how they can rise above the noise. You must be in a space that is defendable and ownable. Check out the Innovation on Demand Courses and Packages to help get you on the right track.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

MobCraft Beer Homepage

Henry's Shark Tank Episode

 

Feb 20, 2018

How do you get those that want to stay in the status quo see the light of innovation? Why do some people seem like they fear change? That’s the question, submitted by LaunchStreeter Kelly Foster, that we answer today. My co-pilot, Connie Warden and I dig into how to “validate and connect,” the difference between mindful and mindless and how to think differently about driving change. We also discover that Connie once banked a plane and Tamara thinks you are the reason innovation doesn’t gain momentum.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:16] Half of the battle of change is getting the people to go along with you. Connie believes that it’s the tension of knowing what we know and being both comfortable and uncomfortable with the unknown.

[4:51] How can one help the blind to see the innovation light? Tamara shares a personal experience from one of her keynotes. It’s most important to bring change to the table by bringing awareness. We need to point out that it isn’t that things have been “wrong.” We will always be evolving and transforming.

[7:42] Humans are either growing or decaying. Find out how Connie gets the organization to buy into the idea of change.

[8:50] Listen in to find out how asking your family if they like your new recipe can help you learn to remove your own personal feelings of rejection from the equation.

[11:14] Tamara and Connie talk about positioning change and new ideas. Tamara shares that a powerful way to steer leaders toward change is instead of going to them with just the new idea, listen to what they are saying and find a way to connect the dots. Connie believes that this helps the person understand that you see them and that you are looking for their experience and buy-in. Tamara talks about brain highways and the importance of wording things so that they are positive.

[17:30] Millenials expect change and see it as constant. Tamara thinks we can all learn from their enthusiasm and willingness to accept change.

[18:47] Connie was a flight attendant with Continental Airlines. She was in the cockpit of an Airbus and the pilot asked her if she wanted to bank the airplane. So, she did!

[21:08] One of the first things Connie learned as a flight attendant was that people were very predictable depending on what city they were arriving or departing from. Bringing awareness to the mind is so powerful. Listen in to find out what difference can be made when you learn the culture of your environment. Tamara shares the importance of speaking to people in a way that it connects to them. We need to speak their language. This helps to validate and connect what they have done in the past while bringing them forward.

[23:58] Connie relates a story from Jon Kabat-Zinn regarding the powerful connection when we speak the same language. Tamara challenges listeners to practice in our daily lives two things: First, speak the language of the other person. Second, practice getting comfortable with negative feedback.

[25:40] Tamara talks about personal responsibility. If you want to own it, it’s your responsibility to drive the change. Connie relates a story about her mom learning the iPad. She just kept “pecking” on the keyboard because that is what her neuro pathways related to.

[28:07] Think of creating change as creating new neuropathways. In order to release the tension, and overcome the fear of change, we must validate and connect.

[29:18] Tamara challenges listeners to check out all the videos and tips on the blog that will help you step into the light.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Jon Kabat-Zinn's 9 Mediation Tips to Cultivate Mindfulness

Launchstreet blog

Feb 13, 2018

Are you tired of people telling you to be more entrepreneurial or wondering what it takes to adapt in today’s changing marketplace? Me, too! That’s why I had Joni Fedders, the president of Aileron, a national nonprofit committed to helping individuals and small businesses succeed, stop by Inside LaunchStreet. We talk about the power of adding value to the world, the anabolic and catabolic energy it takes to be an entrepreneur and how leaping into the unknown has helped her succeed.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:38] Many people are surprised to learn that Joni found her voice at age 12 when she wrote a letter to the editor complaining about a business that left their lights on all night. Little did she know that the business was her Dad’s company!

[2:48] Aileron’s mission is to raise the quality of life in America by developing growing and sustainable companies.

[3:59] Is it possible for a lot of little businesses to have the same impact as large corporate businesses?

[5:02] Joni shares that for small businesses to compete, and be successful entrepreneurs, they need to be proactive and adaptive. You need to be consciously adaptive and aware of what’s happening. You must be good change agents.

[7:03] Do change agents make change happen or do they leverage change as it’s happening?

[8:35] Tamara reminds listeners that right now there is so much room to be the long-term change agent.

[8:56] Being an innovator isn’t just your work. It’s your life. Joni asks class participants one question to point out that there are a lot of emotions that accompany successful entrepreneurs. She asks, When you hear the name of your business, what emotions run through your body?

[10:47] Tamara asks Joni if you always have to feel energized and excited. Get introduced to anabolic and catabolic energy. Joni believes that it’s natural to feel both positive and negative emotions. What’s most important is becoming conscious to the emotions.

[14:00] Tamara and Joni discuss that it’s often hard to deal with the isolation of small business. Often, business owners take it all on their shoulders. Joni’s classes can help people deal with the pressure.

[16:20] Tamara reminds listeners about the importance of seeking other people’s perspective. Learn about the power of a peer advisory board. What does the advisory board look like?

[18:48] Failure and Success make up the two sides of the entrepreneur coin. Joni shares an example of failure with Iams Dog Food. Joni believes that biggest contributing factor to successful entrepreneurship is that you are able to create and articulate value.

[20:09] In today’s marketplace, is it enough to go to market with something better or stronger?

[24:02] What are some commonalities in businesses that succeed? Joni believes that successful businesses are conscious and adaptable. They focus on a win/win scenario — a win for the customer and a win for the business.

[28:03] Tamara mentions that most great leaders lean into learning and keep an open mind.

[28:35] Find out how Joni’s risk-taker imaginative archetype led her from dog food to starting her own tech company.

[31:17] Connect with Joni at Aileron.org.

[31:31] Joni shares that there were many times that she looked back and thought, Wow, I’ve made some big mistakes — but, I am sure glad I did it.

[32:45] Tamara shares that she recently encouraged a member of her family to leave corporate America in search of her own consulting firm. If her experiment fails, she will gain valuable learning to take back into the corporate world.

[34:57] Joni offers two pieces of advice. One — continue to become more of a conscious Aileron leader. Be aware of what you are thinking. Two —keep an open mind and continue to learn. Experimentation adds value.

[36:25] Tamara reminds listeners that it's not enough to be better. You have to add value and articulate value. The value must be innovative! Watch the video about how to avoid the ‘-er’ trap on Innovation on Demand to become a successful entrepreneur.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Aileron

Feb 6, 2018

Are you as fed up as I am with all the lip service to change management? We keep talking about it yet most change management efforts fail. That's why I hunted down a few leaders, like Paul Gibbons, author of The Science Of Successful Organizational Change, to help us better understand why they fail and how to do it right. Paul came by Inside LaunchStreet to talk about why most efforts fail, how availability bias is our biggest sabotager, the power of questioning literally everything, and what to do to drive lasting change.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:48] Paul’s nickname is Disco Paul, dating back to age 15 when he won a disco contest wearing polyester pants!

[3:57] Listen in to find out why management change is such a hot topic right now. Paul introduces us to the term “availability bias.”

[6:05] Availability bias is where we overweight data available to us. We see only how much effort we are putting in.

[7:05] Paul hypothesizes that we should be talking more about change. There are 100 electives at the Harvard Business School and only one class teaches about how to make changes. Schools shouldn’t be teaching that change is the exception; it’s more of the rule.

[10:27] The best piece of advice Paul can offer to LaunchStreeters is to involve people sufficiently and early enough in the change management process. People are more welcoming to change if they feel as if their voice has been heard.

[11:52] One major piece Paul would like you to take away from his book, The Science of Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture, is to question everything. Paul’s book is a debunking about the early change models. Listen in to find out why change in business is often compared to death. Paul talks about the Kubler Ross Model.

[16:39] Learn about the history of burning platforms in comparison to change management.

[20:25] When did Paul realize that the narratives and platforms surrounding change management were not the real deal?

[25:50] Tamara reminds listeners that we as humans are dynamic. Our organizations are also dynamic. We cannot pigeonhole change into a one-size-fits-all.

[29:24] Paul talks about the psychological aspect of taking risks. It’s important to understand how your team responds when they are under the pressure of taking risks.

[32:04] Is risk culture created by the hard wiring that we bring into the decision or is it the risk psychology that we adopt?

[34:20] Paul and Tamara talk about failure and the inauthenticity of failure. Paul references the failures of Amazon.

[37:12] Paul talks about starting his new company and the importance of creating a compelling ‘we’ vision. You must have something that touches people’s hearts and creates passion. This will get your project off the ground. Tamara reminds listeners that you must have people buy into the ‘why’ of the project.

[41:30] Tamara reminds Launchstreeters how important it is to bring others into your vision.

[41:59] Connect with Paul here and listen to Paul’s newly launched podcast, Think Bigger, Think Better.

[44:43] How can innovators help to shift change in their organizations?

[49:54] Tamara reminds listeners about asking inciting questions — the questions we’ve never asked — can stir and prompt new insights. To find out more about inciting questions, visit Innovation on Demand.

 

If you are ready to:

  • get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea
  • be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change
  • foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Kubler Ross Grief Model

Kotters 8-Step Change Model

The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization, by Paul M. Senge

Reboot Your Life: A 12-day Program for Ending Stress, Realizing Your Goals, and Being More Productive, by Paul Gibbons

The Science of Successful Organizational Change: How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture, by Paul Gibbons

Pauls homepage

Jan 30, 2018

It’s as if information overload has taken over and I can’t figure out the difference between the noise and the junk. Know what I mean? And then I wonder, how am I supposed to innovate when I have no time or clarity? Our guest, Zach First, the Executive Director of the Drucker Institute (yes, founded by the management guru, Peter Drucker) talks to us on Inside LaunchStreet about the negative impact of “information obesity” and how having one part of your team or organization working and being innovative is like only having your knee work while the rest of the body is barely keeping it together.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:22] Zach loves singing in church because he isn’t standing out. The end goal is simple — just to sing!

[3:54] Zach gives some insight into the Drucker Institute. It was founded when Peter Drucker, the Father of Management, watched what happens firsthand when management fails to perform. The message of the Institute is to strengthen organizations by strengthening societies.

[6:34] The Drucker Institute just released an article in The WSJ, “The 250 Most Effectively Managed U.S. Companies — and How They Got That Way” Tamara questions how the management landscape of today has changed. Zach believes that part of the change is that management is obsessed with the latest and greatest things. The world is a lot more numerical than it has been in the past. The focus is on metrics and transparent data.

[9:52] Get introduced to Doris Drucker’s term, “information obesity.” It’s important to be careful how much and what kind of information you are consuming. Zach shares three tips to determine the metrics that are worth paying attention to for organization success.

[14:09] Tamara encourages Launchstreeters to apply the information obesity phrase to your life and carefully monitor your information intake.

[15:44] Listen in as Zach discusses how Peter Drucker compares management problems to the human body. Innovation can be compared to the beating heart. Every part of our organization should be engaged in innovation. Innovation is something more than property. It should be thought about as a systematic discipline that can be practiced throughout the organization. Tamara and Zach discuss silos.

[19:44] Zach mentions the East Company article by Rick Wartzman when talking about employees being the company’s greatest asset. We are at a standoff between loyalty between employer and employee. How much should companies spend on employees that show little loyalty?

[23:27] Zach’s article in The HBR, “Rethinking the Corporate Love Affair With Change” highlights why we need to rethink our views regarding change. It’s time to temper how we think about change in organizations. It’s imperative to consider human beings first and build your pace of change around them to achieve organizational success.

[26:12] Organizations often get into a cycle of chasing change. Zach gives listeners two valuable pieces of information. One: You don’t want to constantly be having organ transplants. Two: While you're chasing the competition, they are busy chasing you too!

[29:37] How does a leader manage both people who accept change and people who don’t accept change? How does the ping pong effect of the strategic optimist and the defensive pessimist combine to get work done?

[32:44] Zach and Tamara discuss how to get the ping pong going and a powerful assignment to develop ideas. The optimists and pessimists combine to reach an end solution that ends up with a product launch.

[35:36] Zach talks about some of the companies on the 250 Most Effectively Managed List. The crucial key in all of these all-stars is that they are able to maintain a focus in all five areas.

[39:56] Connect with Zach and his team at The Drucker Institute.

[40:26] The Drucker Institute has some exciting things happening in 2018. They are launching a data consulting service and an investment product available to everyday investors. They will also be awarding their annual $100,000 innovation prize to a non-profit.

[42:00] The most important piece of advice for Launchstreeters to lead in today’s world would be to remember that there is no wonder man or wonder woman. Be mindful of the peaks and valleys. Understand and be mindful of the things you do well and the things you need improvement on.

[43:28] Zach and Tamara discuss failure. Zach suggests that we should look at failure like it’s a gift. We should open it and discuss the failure. We should think about it, talk about it, put in on the shelf and look at it.

[45:46] How are organizations like people?

[49:01] Go to Innovation on Demand to find out how to get more people involved so you can create a more systemic approach to innovation.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

“The 250 Most Effectively Managed U.S. Companies — and How They Got That Way”

The Drucker Institute

 

Jan 23, 2018

Sometimes being an entrepreneur or innovator feels like signing up for a grueling event, day after day. So why do it? And how do you do it in a way that feels rewarding and like you are making an impact? That’s exactly what I asked seasoned serial entrepreneur and co-founder of Gladly, Michael Wolfe, when he came by Inside LaunchStreet. I think you’ll find his comments about why he keeps coming back for more and how he takes “breaks” between fascinating. Also, listen for how he talks about the mindset behind taking risks, adding value, and driving success. It might give you some insight into how you tackle your next big, messy project or business.

Key Takeaways:

[1:27] Mike shares that he’s unusual in that he keeps coming back for more! He has five startup companies, making him the ultimate serial entrepreneur! Listen in to find out his secret for success.

[3:00] How does Mike stay connected when he’s on “break”?

[5:23] Tamara challenges Launchstreeters when taking a break from the daily grind to take the opportunity to learn things that are outside of your category. Then, come back and apply the things you learned.

[7:10] Listen in to find out what motivates Mike to keep coming back for more.

[9:42] What is the difference between the startups that work and those that don’t work?

Why is it less about luck and more about timing? Get introduced to the term founder-market fit.

[13:16] Tamara shares the success story about Tough Mudder and how most people didn’t believe that it was a good idea.

[14:29] Gladly is selling mostly to B2C companies, anyone that has millions of consumers they’re supporting. The first question Mike asks is: Does your company have good customer service? Second, can consumers talk to you? (by mobile app, text, Twitter, Facebook?) Gladly is bringing all of the essential communication together.

[19:02] Consumers are comparing you to their experiences at other companies. If you have a customer service issue, it ends up in the media and spreads quickly. The bar continues to go up in customer satisfaction.

[20:13] Find out what lessons has Mike learned along the way trying to change legacy systems? Mike shares some things to look for when companies are demonstrating readiness to change.

[22:54] Startup companies and large companies can benefit from each other in a variety of ways. Mike talks about how to cross this bridge and meet in that gray area.

[27:11] Big companies tend to think of large capital investments. Everything is BIG! Innovation happens with lots of experiments. Often, the experiments don’t cost a lot.

 

Mike challenges Launchstreeters to deliver some small project today. Try a few things. Don’t wait until someone gives you a budget and permission to innovate. Prove it by doing something!

[30:04] Legacy thinking is all about getting the project done. The innovation is more about discovering what the project should be.

[30:38] What’s the role for the human factor in technology and innovations? Is the human factor more or less important today?

[33:49] Humans bring added value because they are the problem solvers. When technology is helping your industry, it probably means you’re in a growing industry where you are learning. Mike challenges listeners that no matter what career you are in, embrace technology.

[36:48] Connect with Mike at Gladly.com.

[37:09] Mike explains that the riskiest thing you can do is NOT innovate! It all starts with a mindset. Your personal mindset and your organization need to realize that change is going to continue to occur. Technology never ‘uninvents’ itself. You don’t have a choice to be innovative or not to be innovative.

{40:13] Tamara reminds listeners that being an entrepreneur is a way of thinking about where the gaps in the marketplace exist and then filling in the gap.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Gladly

Product Hunt

Jan 16, 2018

Do you ever feel like you are just going through the motions? Or maybe you know there is more potential inside of you that you aren’t tapping. I know we can’t be ON all the time but it wouldn’t it be great to feel energized and at your best at the place where you literally spend most of your life — work? I’m not talking about health, although that's important, I’m talking about leadership potential, the potential we all have in us. Today’s guest on Inside LaunchStreet, Jason Treu, is a leadership potential expert, executive coach to leaders and rising stars, and a TEDx speaker. We chat about why leadership is more than just a title and how to get past just “showing up” to work.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:01] Listen in to find out how Jason became passionate about maximizing potential performance.

[3:04] Tamara questions why and how accountability often slips by the wayside. Jason defines accountability as showing up even when you don’t want to, actually taking action, and moving into uncertainty. You have to be curious and own your own outcome.

[6:29] Who is responsible for attaining leadership skills? The employee or the leader?

Most often, employees don’t know what to do. They need to take self-development into their own hands.

[8:58] Jason suggests that entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs won’t make significant progress until all three leadership pillars are operating. Pillar 1: managing systems, having a knowledge of tools and best practices. Pillar 2: accessing mentors and coaches. Pillar 3: caring/finding support from others that understand.

[12:42] Jason and Tamara ‘groupthink’ uncovering blind spots. Your brain is wired not to let you see them. You have to go through different processes to find them. Jason shares a powerful example of how a sales associate overcame shame and is now sharing her experience with clients. Vulnerability helps to build a solid, permanent relationship.

[18:29] Tamara and Jason discuss the power of vulnerability. Google spent millions of dollars to find out what kind of people make up the perfect team. Find out why psychological safety topped the list included in all high-performing teams.

[21:25] Tamara shares that she used to schedule no meetings on Friday but instead would spend the day taking her team to coffee and get to know the team. This developed a trusting, caring relationship that increased her team’s performance. Jason believes that the most important pillar is caring.

[25:18] Jason reminds us that humanity and emotions should not be put in the back seat. You need to be yourself, even at work, not a composition of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Loneliness is at its highest rate, at 40 percent, in human history. Humans need connection. It’s as important as eating, drinking, and breathing. You have to have go-to people.

[30:04] How did we get to this point of few connections and loneliness?

[32:33] Tamara challenges Launchstreeters to take the time to build connections and bonds and add the layer of collaboration to find joy.

[35:14] Jason created a game called, Cards Against Mundanity, to help people build leadership skills. The game creates the magic; it creates empathy. Empathy is going through a similar emotion, not experience. Common experiences create bonds and productivity raises. If you have a friend at work, your productivity goes up 7X.

[38:25] Leading teams and team builders must take a step back and work on the foundation: vulnerability, potential, and connections. The real success is in the soft skills.

[40:30] Jason shares some tips on how to overcome the hurdle when we ask our team to innovate and make behavior changes.

[43:20] Connect with Jason here.

[44:40] Tamara reminds listeners that innovation requires you to be fully present. Contributing in a meaningful way actually elevates your engagement. Tamara challenges listeners to focus on unlocking your innovation muscles because then your engagement will rise naturally.

 

If you are ready to:

■ get buy-in from key decision makers on your next big idea

■ be a high-impact, high-value member that ignites change

■ foster a culture of innovation where everyone on your team is bringing innovative ideas that tackle challenges and seize opportunities...

Join us on LaunchStreet — gotolaunchstreet.com

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

TEDx Talk: “How to Get CoWorkers to Like Each Other”

Arthur Aron Study

Cards Against Mundanity

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